Black People : Why white people need to admit that black people know more about pain

john54

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MEMBER
Aug 21, 2018
16
7
So I'm a 28 year old white guy in the U.S. and I guess this will be my introductory post. I hope this is the right place to post this but if not, please feel free to delete.

Anyway, just going off recent experience, yesterday I watched Blackkklansman in a Portland theater and it was hard to watch, mainly because I noticed I had to stop myself from laughing or smiling at certain parts that were really f'ed up. My impression was that that was the question the movie was putting to white people: "So, did you think it was funny? Did you like it?" Nothing was funny about that movie and yet it was making me realize that whether I want it there or not, like most white people, I've got a little racist living inside me.

There were a few black people in the theater and there was one black guy in the back who was laughing throughout the movie, especially at the racist scenes. Eventually someone shushed him and he blew up, shouting, "Don't you f*****ng tell me to shut up! They keep saying it over and over, "N***** this! N***** that! N******! N*****! N*****! F*** this movie! F*** all you white mother-*******!"

He kept shouting and hitting the wall until an usher made him leave the theater, and after the movie the usher started apologizing to people leaving for the interruption. I told the usher, who was white, that I don't think he should be apologizing, and that while I get what he's saying, there's a bigger issue going on than just "he interrupted the movie." I said I don't think that was a movie you're meant to enjoy and I was glad that guy had been there.

So the friends I was with said, "I don't get why he got so mad." and in truth, I don't think I’m able to get it either, but what I do think I get if nothing else is this: That guy might have seemed angry to some people, but all I heard was someone really, really hurt. Like, beyond hurt.

I know a bit about pain - I tried to kill myself when I was a teenager; like, seriously tried to kill myself, with a note and everything, and wound up in the hospital. And I'm a pretty sensitive guy. And I'm saying, I'm not sure if even in my worst moments I have ever been as upset as that guy sounded to me. He didn't seem crazy - up until the moment someone told him to be quiet he sounded like a normal guy, and a normal person doesn't get that upset, they just don't.

And I've heard that kind of hurt from a lot of black people I've known or met, something deep, something carnal, and it's not about them - it's about white people. Not just the out-in-the-open racists but white people everywhere, especially in the U.S., who won't acknowledge or do anything about the fact that something really twisted and sick is going on in this world, especially in this country, and black people have been taking the brunt of it for a long time.

White people like to talk about equivalence a lot: "Well, maybe this black person has endured racism but racism against whites is real too." or "Well, I'm sure black people are having a hard time but that's no excuse for interrupting a movie, that was really distressing to me."

Well, maybe it's about time white people started getting distressed. Because, this is just the sense I'm getting but I just don't think any pain we white people endure in our daily lives is really comparable to what black people endure from living in a racist society. People like to say, "Well pain is pain, let's not dismiss what anyone's going through" but in truth, I think white people who complain about racism against whites are wimps and are the very deepest level of pathetic. If you're white like me, this is my message to you: we don't know what systemic racism feels like so let's keep our mouths shut about what we don't know and listen for a change.

I'm not saying all or even most white people have it easy, I'm not dismissing the hardships and anxieties of lower and middle class white working men and women, I'm not trying to deny that there is a very real stigma many black people have against white people, and I'm definitely not trying to downplay racism against Jews or say that racism is only perpetrated against people of African ancestry.

What I am trying to say is that, in reality, not all pain is equal, and yes, not all racism is felt as strongly. I lived in rural Japan for a year, and I experienced some racism - being stared at wherever I went, shopkeepers glaring at me for no reason and shoving change into my hand, being asked to speak for Americans as if all U.S. citizens were like me, being harassed by cops who told me to leave the country - hell, I was even accused of being a terrorist for not being Japanese and asked to leave a bar. It was annoying. It hurt a bit. Sometimes it hurt a lot. But in the end, honestly, I've felt worse.

In the end I could come back to the U.S. where no one gives me a sideways glance, where shopkeepers don't look at me twice, and where white terrorism, though very real, is deemed non-existent. So I ask myself, what if people in the U.S. looked at me sidelong wherever I went with fear, or anger, or distrust just because I'm white. What if half of all white men had been to prison or were bound for prison at some point. What if I regularly endured racism in my OWN COUNTRY but was told that it didn't exist. How would that feel? If I'm going to be honest, I just don't know. So I think that it's good to leave the door open for the possibility that other people have it worse than me, even if I can't understand their experience.
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
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Nov 17, 2006
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So I'm a 28 year old white guy in the U.S. and I guess this will be my introductory post. I hope this is the right place to post this but if not, please feel free to delete.

Anyway, just going off recent experience, yesterday I watched Blackkklansman in a Portland theater and it was hard to watch, mainly because I noticed I had to stop myself from laughing or smiling at certain parts that were really f'ed up. My impression was that that was the question the movie was putting to white people: "So, did you think it was funny? Did you like it?" Nothing was funny about that movie and yet it was making me realize that whether I want it there or not, like most white people, I've got a little racist living inside me.

There were a few black people in the theater and there was one black guy in the back who was laughing throughout the movie, especially at the racist scenes. Eventually someone shushed him and he blew up, shouting, "Don't you f*****ng tell me to shut up! They keep saying it over and over, "N***** this! N***** that! N******! N*****! N*****! F*** this movie! F*** all you white mother-*******!"

He kept shouting and hitting the wall until an usher made him leave the theater, and after the movie the usher started apologizing to people leaving for the interruption. I told the usher, who was white, that I don't think he should be apologizing, and that while I get what he's saying, there's a bigger issue going on than just "he interrupted the movie." I said I don't think that was a movie you're meant to enjoy and I was glad that guy had been there.

So the friends I was with said, "I don't get why he got so mad." and in truth, I don't think I’m able to get it either, but what I do think I get if nothing else is this: That guy might have seemed angry to some people, but all I heard was someone really, really hurt. Like, beyond hurt.

I know a bit about pain - I tried to kill myself when I was a teenager; like, seriously tried to kill myself, with a note and everything, and wound up in the hospital. And I'm a pretty sensitive guy. And I'm saying, I'm not sure if even in my worst moments I have ever been as upset as that guy sounded to me. He didn't seem crazy - up until the moment someone told him to be quiet he sounded like a normal guy, and a normal person doesn't get that upset, they just don't.

And I've heard that kind of hurt from a lot of black people I've known or met, something deep, something carnal, and it's not about them - it's about white people. Not just the out-in-the-open racists but white people everywhere, especially in the U.S., who won't acknowledge or do anything about the fact that something really twisted and sick is going on in this world, especially in this country, and black people have been taking the brunt of it for a long time.

White people like to talk about equivalence a lot: "Well, maybe this black person has endured racism but racism against whites is real too." or "Well, I'm sure black people are having a hard time but that's no excuse for interrupting a movie, that was really distressing to me."

Well, maybe it's about time white people started getting distressed. Because, this is just the sense I'm getting but I just don't think any pain we white people endure in our daily lives is really comparable to what black people endure from living in a racist society. People like to say, "Well pain is pain, let's not dismiss what anyone's going through" but in truth, I think white people who complain about racism against whites are wimps and are the very deepest level of pathetic. If you're white like me, this is my message to you: we don't know what systemic racism feels like so let's keep our mouths shut about what we don't know and listen for a change.

I'm not saying all or even most white people have it easy, I'm not dismissing the hardships and anxieties of lower and middle class white working men and women, I'm not trying to deny that there is a very real stigma many black people have against white people, and I'm definitely not trying to downplay racism against Jews or say that racism is only perpetrated against people of African ancestry.

What I am trying to say is that, in reality, not all pain is equal, and yes, not all racism is felt as strongly. I lived in rural Japan for a year, and I experienced some racism - being stared at wherever I went, shopkeepers glaring at me for no reason and shoving change into my hand, being asked to speak for Americans as if all U.S. citizens were like me, being harassed by cops who told me to leave the country - hell, I was even accused of being a terrorist for not being Japanese and asked to leave a bar. It was annoying. It hurt a bit. Sometimes it hurt a lot. But in the end, honestly, I've felt worse.

In the end I could come back to the U.S. where no one gives me a sideways glance, where shopkeepers don't look at me twice, and where white terrorism, though very real, is deemed non-existent. So I ask myself, what if people in the U.S. looked at me sidelong wherever I went with fear, or anger, or distrust just because I'm white. What if half of all white men had been to prison or were bound for prison at some point. What if I regularly endured racism in my OWN COUNTRY but was told that it didn't exist. How would that feel? If I'm going to be honest, I just don't know. So I think that it's good to leave the door open for the possibility that other people have it worse than me, even if I can't understand their experience.


Welcome john54,

The title of your Thread and its content, speaks volumes, here it is again:

Why white people need to admit that black people know more about pain

Also, the content seems to reflect you may be of the John Brown spirit, nevertheless, the Thread below explains just how white folk can support the pain they admit we know more about... click the link and give it a read:




...


 

john54

Member
MEMBER
Aug 21, 2018
16
7
Welcome john54,

The title of your Thread and its content, speaks volumes, here it is again:

Why white people need to admit that black people know more about pain

Also, the content seems to reflect you may be of the John Brown spirit, nevertheless, the Thread below explains just how white folk can support the pain they admit we know more about... click the link and give it a read:
Thanks, I'm going to check it out.

Well I see our resident Bavarian movie critic is back critiquing another one of our "faulted" Black movies. But here's the rub. He claims to have just viewed it yesterday in Portland Oregon in the United States yet in his last paragraph he alludes to the possibility of returning to America from...hmmmmmm Bavaria? I guess his alter ego pouncing on another so-called unrealistic Black movie named Black Panther in an earlier rant was via a nation selected VPN or he's using one now.

What astounds me is this same movie critic has given our "obvious to him only" waste of Black films two thumbs down. So far.

March 12, 2018 Thumbs down: Black Panther

August 22, 2018 Thumbs down: Blackkklansman

Interesting.
That guy sounds like a *****, but I'm not him. I wasn't criticizing the movie if it came off that way, it was probably the most offensive thing I've ever seen so in other words yeah, wow, it's hard to know what to say about it but that if there's any racism in you, Blackkklansman will bring it out. It was really well done, for better or worse.

I came back from Japan a year ago where I was teaching English in Wakayama and learning the language. The town was 99.9% Japanese people, most of whom only knew other Japanese so I stood out like a hangnail.
 

john54

Member
MEMBER
Aug 21, 2018
16
7
Welcome john54,

The title of your Thread and its content, speaks volumes, here it is again:

Why white people need to admit that black people know more about pain

Also, the content seems to reflect you may be of the John Brown spirit, nevertheless, the Thread below explains just how white folk can support the pain they admit we know more about... click the link and give it a read:


...
Good deal...
Going over a few of the articles posted there....Between $1.4 trillion and $6.4 trillion would be owed factoring in stolen labor and lives during slavery and also including repression of black rights and upward mobility since then, like redlining, white terrorism against African Americans, segregation and upward mobility that excluded blacks.

It makes sense and it's not going to be easy to get any amount passed. I liked what one author was saying about how Bernie sanders, for all his socialism and confronting impossible odds declared reparations impossible to get passed. It's like white people have been stealing and hoarding chairs in a seating hall for generations so black people have always had to stand, but whites are saying that it was their ancestors who stole the chairs and they just inherited them so it's not their fault.

One author mention, "Germany made an effort to repay the Jews for the horrors of the Holocaust. Japanese-Americans were repaid for suffering in internment camps. Black Americans deserve no less."

It's true that if you go to Germany, you'll have a hard time finding Germans who defend the nazis. One German I met while traveling told me, "Germans aren't really anything. We don't have patriotism in Germany or national pride or anything like that. Germany did evil things in the past so things like patriotism just don't exist there."

So Germany made the painful recognition that their ancestors were evil, yet we still have tens of millions of Americans worshipping the confederates or just not acknowledging how they've benefited and are still benefiting from slavery and black oppression...Germany, in order to make that recognition and make reparation, had to essentially abandon patriotism though and admit their country was evil. Could the U.S. ever do the same, I wonder?
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Nov 17, 2006
52,975
11,456
Occupation
Speaker/Teacher/Author
Going over a few of the articles posted there....Between $1.4 trillion and $6.4 trillion would be owed factoring in stolen labor and lives during slavery and also including repression of black rights and upward mobility since then, like redlining, white terrorism against African Americans, segregation and upward mobility that excluded blacks.

It makes sense and it's not going to be easy to get any amount passed. I liked what one author was saying about how Bernie sanders, for all his socialism and confronting impossible odds declared reparations impossible to get passed. It's like white people have been stealing and hoarding chairs in a seating hall for generations so black people have always had to stand, but whites are saying that it was their ancestors who stole the chairs and they just inherited them so it's not their fault.

One author mention, "Germany made an effort to repay the Jews for the horrors of the Holocaust. Japanese-Americans were repaid for suffering in internment camps. Black Americans deserve no less."

It's true that if you go to Germany, you'll have a hard time finding Germans who defend the nazis. One German I met while traveling told me, "Germans aren't really anything. We don't have patriotism in Germany or national pride or anything like that. Germany did evil things in the past so things like patriotism just don't exist there."

So Germany made the painful recognition that their ancestors were evil, yet we still have tens of millions of Americans worshipping the confederates or just not acknowledging how they've benefited and are still benefiting from slavery and black oppression...Germany, in order to make that recognition and make reparation, had to essentially abandon patriotism though and admit their country was evil. Could the U.S. ever do the same, I wonder?

Good points, we touch and agree :five:

Moreover, economists have academically opine, it would make good sense to pay Reparations to Black Americans on the basis that the economy would explode overnight. Black folk spend in lieu of saving, which is to say, the circular flow of money would return right back to the coffers of capitalism, and the debt would be paid. Its not like 40 million Blacks would immediately repatriate to Africa or elsewhere.

Therefore, the denial to pay Reparations is grounded solely on the basis of fact couched in pure racism and makes no sense to deny.

...

 

Destee

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Jan 22, 2001
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So I'm a 28 year old white guy in the U.S. and I guess this will be my introductory post. I hope this is the right place to post this but if not, please feel free to delete.

Anyway, just going off recent experience, yesterday I watched Blackkklansman in a Portland theater and it was hard to watch, mainly because I noticed I had to stop myself from laughing or smiling at certain parts that were really f'ed up. My impression was that that was the question the movie was putting to white people: "So, did you think it was funny? Did you like it?" Nothing was funny about that movie and yet it was making me realize that whether I want it there or not, like most white people, I've got a little racist living inside me.

There were a few black people in the theater and there was one black guy in the back who was laughing throughout the movie, especially at the racist scenes. Eventually someone shushed him and he blew up, shouting, "Don't you f*****ng tell me to shut up! They keep saying it over and over, "N***** this! N***** that! N******! N*****! N*****! F*** this movie! F*** all you white mother-*******!"

He kept shouting and hitting the wall until an usher made him leave the theater, and after the movie the usher started apologizing to people leaving for the interruption. I told the usher, who was white, that I don't think he should be apologizing, and that while I get what he's saying, there's a bigger issue going on than just "he interrupted the movie." I said I don't think that was a movie you're meant to enjoy and I was glad that guy had been there.

So the friends I was with said, "I don't get why he got so mad." and in truth, I don't think I’m able to get it either, but what I do think I get if nothing else is this: That guy might have seemed angry to some people, but all I heard was someone really, really hurt. Like, beyond hurt.

I know a bit about pain - I tried to kill myself when I was a teenager; like, seriously tried to kill myself, with a note and everything, and wound up in the hospital. And I'm a pretty sensitive guy. And I'm saying, I'm not sure if even in my worst moments I have ever been as upset as that guy sounded to me. He didn't seem crazy - up until the moment someone told him to be quiet he sounded like a normal guy, and a normal person doesn't get that upset, they just don't.

And I've heard that kind of hurt from a lot of black people I've known or met, something deep, something carnal, and it's not about them - it's about white people. Not just the out-in-the-open racists but white people everywhere, especially in the U.S., who won't acknowledge or do anything about the fact that something really twisted and sick is going on in this world, especially in this country, and black people have been taking the brunt of it for a long time.

White people like to talk about equivalence a lot: "Well, maybe this black person has endured racism but racism against whites is real too." or "Well, I'm sure black people are having a hard time but that's no excuse for interrupting a movie, that was really distressing to me."

Well, maybe it's about time white people started getting distressed. Because, this is just the sense I'm getting but I just don't think any pain we white people endure in our daily lives is really comparable to what black people endure from living in a racist society. People like to say, "Well pain is pain, let's not dismiss what anyone's going through" but in truth, I think white people who complain about racism against whites are wimps and are the very deepest level of pathetic. If you're white like me, this is my message to you: we don't know what systemic racism feels like so let's keep our mouths shut about what we don't know and listen for a change.

I'm not saying all or even most white people have it easy, I'm not dismissing the hardships and anxieties of lower and middle class white working men and women, I'm not trying to deny that there is a very real stigma many black people have against white people, and I'm definitely not trying to downplay racism against Jews or say that racism is only perpetrated against people of African ancestry.

What I am trying to say is that, in reality, not all pain is equal, and yes, not all racism is felt as strongly. I lived in rural Japan for a year, and I experienced some racism - being stared at wherever I went, shopkeepers glaring at me for no reason and shoving change into my hand, being asked to speak for Americans as if all U.S. citizens were like me, being harassed by cops who told me to leave the country - hell, I was even accused of being a terrorist for not being Japanese and asked to leave a bar. It was annoying. It hurt a bit. Sometimes it hurt a lot. But in the end, honestly, I've felt worse.

In the end I could come back to the U.S. where no one gives me a sideways glance, where shopkeepers don't look at me twice, and where white terrorism, though very real, is deemed non-existent. So I ask myself, what if people in the U.S. looked at me sidelong wherever I went with fear, or anger, or distrust just because I'm white. What if half of all white men had been to prison or were bound for prison at some point. What if I regularly endured racism in my OWN COUNTRY but was told that it didn't exist. How would that feel? If I'm going to be honest, I just don't know. So I think that it's good to leave the door open for the possibility that other people have it worse than me, even if I can't understand their experience.


:hello: john54 ... Welcome Welcome Welcome ... :wave:

Thanks for joining us and sharing!

Such a thoughtful post, despite the fact that I have not seen or heard of the movie you mention.

I will leave it to you, to say what white people need to admit, though few frequent here (that I am aware of).

I guess you gotta start somewhere and the ghetto is as good a place as any ... I reckon ... :look:


Please make yourself at home!

Much Love and Peace.

:heart:

Destee
 

john54

Member
MEMBER
Aug 21, 2018
16
7
Good points, we touch and agree :five:

Moreover, economists have academically opine, it would make good sense to pay Reparations to Black Americans on the basis that the economy would explode overnight. Black folk spend in lieu of saving, which is to say, the circular flow of money would return right back to the coffers of capitalism, and the debt would be paid. Its not like 40 million Blacks would immediately repatriate to Africa or elsewhere.

Therefore, the denial to pay Reparations is grounded solely on the basis of fact couched in pure racism and makes no sense to deny.

...
I mean, yeah, it would be a really beautiful thing if it happened. Native Americans are owed a very fair share too. Racist attitudes are still very strong and widespread though, and tackling that needs to start happening now because America is on a pretty slippery slope with regards to race. The #MeToo movement and anti gun movement picked up a lot but it seems like black oppression is still being pretty much skirted int he media and in conversations. Perhaps as more racists come out in the open America is going to have no choice but to start confronting some of that ugliness.
 

Sawyerloggingon

Banned
MEMBER
Aug 22, 2018
94
14
So I'm a 28 year old white guy in the U.S. and I guess this will be my introductory post. I hope this is the right place to post this but if not, please feel free to delete.

Anyway, just going off recent experience, yesterday I watched Blackkklansman in a Portland theater and it was hard to watch, mainly because I noticed I had to stop myself from laughing or smiling at certain parts that were really f'ed up. My impression was that that was the question the movie was putting to white people: "So, did you think it was funny? Did you like it?" Nothing was funny about that movie and yet it was making me realize that whether I want it there or not, like most white people, I've got a little racist living inside me.

There were a few black people in the theater and there was one black guy in the back who was laughing throughout the movie, especially at the racist scenes. Eventually someone shushed him and he blew up, shouting, "Don't you f*****ng tell me to shut up! They keep saying it over and over, "N***** this! N***** that! N******! N*****! N*****! F*** this movie! F*** all you white mother-*******!"

He kept shouting and hitting the wall until an usher made him leave the theater, and after the movie the usher started apologizing to people leaving for the interruption. I told the usher, who was white, that I don't think he should be apologizing, and that while I get what he's saying, there's a bigger issue going on than just "he interrupted the movie." I said I don't think that was a movie you're meant to enjoy and I was glad that guy had been there.

So the friends I was with said, "I don't get why he got so mad." and in truth, I don't think I’m able to get it either, but what I do think I get if nothing else is this: That guy might have seemed angry to some people, but all I heard was someone really, really hurt. Like, beyond hurt.

I know a bit about pain - I tried to kill myself when I was a teenager; like, seriously tried to kill myself, with a note and everything, and wound up in the hospital. And I'm a pretty sensitive guy. And I'm saying, I'm not sure if even in my worst moments I have ever been as upset as that guy sounded to me. He didn't seem crazy - up until the moment someone told him to be quiet he sounded like a normal guy, and a normal person doesn't get that upset, they just don't.

And I've heard that kind of hurt from a lot of black people I've known or met, something deep, something carnal, and it's not about them - it's about white people. Not just the out-in-the-open racists but white people everywhere, especially in the U.S., who won't acknowledge or do anything about the fact that something really twisted and sick is going on in this world, especially in this country, and black people have been taking the brunt of it for a long time.

White people like to talk about equivalence a lot: "Well, maybe this black person has endured racism but racism against whites is real too." or "Well, I'm sure black people are having a hard time but that's no excuse for interrupting a movie, that was really distressing to me."

Well, maybe it's about time white people started getting distressed. Because, this is just the sense I'm getting but I just don't think any pain we white people endure in our daily lives is really comparable to what black people endure from living in a racist society. People like to say, "Well pain is pain, let's not dismiss what anyone's going through" but in truth, I think white people who complain about racism against whites are wimps and are the very deepest level of pathetic. If you're white like me, this is my message to you: we don't know what systemic racism feels like so let's keep our mouths shut about what we don't know and listen for a change.

I'm not saying all or even most white people have it easy, I'm not dismissing the hardships and anxieties of lower and middle class white working men and women, I'm not trying to deny that there is a very real stigma many black people have against white people, and I'm definitely not trying to downplay racism against Jews or say that racism is only perpetrated against people of African ancestry.

What I am trying to say is that, in reality, not all pain is equal, and yes, not all racism is felt as strongly. I lived in rural Japan for a year, and I experienced some racism - being stared at wherever I went, shopkeepers glaring at me for no reason and shoving change into my hand, being asked to speak for Americans as if all U.S. citizens were like me, being harassed by cops who told me to leave the country - hell, I was even accused of being a terrorist for not being Japanese and asked to leave a bar. It was annoying. It hurt a bit. Sometimes it hurt a lot. But in the end, honestly, I've felt worse.

In the end I could come back to the U.S. where no one gives me a sideways glance, where shopkeepers don't look at me twice, and where white terrorism, though very real, is deemed non-existent. So I ask myself, what if people in the U.S. looked at me sidelong wherever I went with fear, or anger, or distrust just because I'm white. What if half of all white men had been to prison or were bound for prison at some point. What if I regularly endured racism in my OWN COUNTRY but was told that it didn't exist. How would that feel? If I'm going to be honest, I just don't know. So I think that it's good to leave the door open for the possibility that other people have it worse than me, even if I can't understand their experience.
I read your post and have to say I sense some white guilt here that I think is prominent among young whites these days. The past is the past and it's time to move on. Picking the scab of an old wound just keeps it open. Yes there is still a few racist in this country but for the most part most people really don't care about color anymore. It does happen but it's pretty rare and generally counteracted by someone who isn't a racist.
Thirty years ago or so I was running a logging crew for a small company and I hired a black kid to set chockers. He was a hard worker and the crew all got along fine with him. After about a month the boss showed up and said to me " I'm not having any n***** work for me, you hired him you fire him". I was raising a family and couldn't risk my job by fighting this battle so I made a call to a friend in Portland Oregon where things were a bit more progressive and asked him if he'd hire this kid and gave him a great recommendation. I felt bad but it was the best I could do. He went to Portland and did very well at the job climbing the ladder fast and ended up with a better job than me with a big company that had all the benefits that I didn't have in the small company I worked for. We still send eachother Christmas cards and he's doing absolutely great. A racist wanting him fired ended up being the best thing that ever happened to him because a non racist was there to right the wrong. "Be the change you want to see in the world"
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Nov 17, 2006
52,975
11,456
Occupation
Speaker/Teacher/Author
I mean, yeah, it would be a really beautiful thing if it happened. Native Americans are owed a very fair share too. Racist attitudes are still very strong and widespread though, and tackling that needs to start happening now because America is on a pretty slippery slope with regards to race. The #MeToo movement and anti gun movement picked up a lot but it seems like black oppression is still being pretty much skirted int he media and in conversations. Perhaps as more racists come out in the open America is going to have no choice but to start confronting some of that ugliness.

Again good point, so, we need a panacea right? Here it is ... BAMN

...
 

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