Black Money Business Jobs : Why Blacks aren't getting into the Lucrative Cannabis Business

Khasm13

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Mar 26, 2003
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When Colorado’s first
medical marijuana dispensaries opened in 2009, Unique Henderson was psyched. He’d been smoking weed since he was 15, and he’d even learned how to grow, from his ex-girlfriend’s father. He spent $750 on classes about how to run a cannabis business, and then he and a friend both applied to work at a Denver pot shop.

Then only his friend was hired. Henderson was more than qualified, so why didn’t he get the gig? His friend asked the managers and came back with infuriating news: Henderson was not allowed to work in the legal cannabis industry because he had been caught twice with a joint’s worth of pot as a teenager back in Oklahoma, and as a result he has two drug possession felonies on his record.

For most jobs, experience will help you get ahead. In the marijuana industry, it’s not that simple. Yes, investors and state governments are eager to hire and license people with expertise in how to cultivate, cure, trim, and process cannabis. But it can’t be someone who got caught. Which for the most part means it can’t be someone who is black.

Even though research shows people of all races are about equally likely to have broken the law by growing, smoking, or selling marijuana, black people are much more likely to have been arrested for it. Black people are much more likely to have ended up with a criminal record because of it. And every state that has legalized medical or recreational marijuana bans people with drug felonies from working at, owning, investing in, or sitting on the board of a cannabis business. After having borne the brunt of the “war on drugs,” black Americans are now largely missing out on the economic opportunities created by legalization.

http://www.buzzfeed.com/amandachicagolewis/americas-white-only-weed-boom#.xvJ6n7oGB
 

Inanna

Well-Known Member
REGISTERED MEMBER
Dec 2, 2014
141
56
longform-original-3510-1458150719-7.jpg


When Colorado’s first
medical marijuana dispensaries opened in 2009, Unique Henderson was psyched. He’d been smoking weed since he was 15, and he’d even learned how to grow, from his ex-girlfriend’s father. He spent $750 on classes about how to run a cannabis business, and then he and a friend both applied to work at a Denver pot shop.

Then only his friend was hired. Henderson was more than qualified, so why didn’t he get the gig? His friend asked the managers and came back with infuriating news: Henderson was not allowed to work in the legal cannabis industry because he had been caught twice with a joint’s worth of pot as a teenager back in Oklahoma, and as a result he has two drug possession felonies on his record.

For most jobs, experience will help you get ahead. In the marijuana industry, it’s not that simple. Yes, investors and state governments are eager to hire and license people with expertise in how to cultivate, cure, trim, and process cannabis. But it can’t be someone who got caught. Which for the most part means it can’t be someone who is black.

Even though research shows people of all races are about equally likely to have broken the law by growing, smoking, or selling marijuana, black people are much more likely to have been arrested for it. Black people are much more likely to have ended up with a criminal record because of it. And every state that has legalized medical or recreational marijuana bans people with drug felonies from working at, owning, investing in, or sitting on the board of a cannabis business. After having borne the brunt of the “war on drugs,” black Americans are now largely missing out on the economic opportunities created by legalization.

http://www.buzzfeed.com/amandachicagolewis/americas-white-only-weed-boom#.xvJ6n7oGB

This is true, idk how it works everywhere. In California you can have marijuana felonies reduced to a misdemeanor and then you can have the misdemeanor expunged. That'll take some time and money, about 6 months and $300 per felony/misdemeanor, but it is possible to do.
 

Inanna

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REGISTERED MEMBER
Dec 2, 2014
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Also some people automatically experienced this. A few people I know had felonies for possession and they dropped them to misdemeanors when the law changed. I think some misdemeanors were also dropped automatically. It depends what you got caught with. Less than an ounce and you're golden. It sucks for people who are locked up for it though. I'm not sure how many/or if any were released for minor drug cases but I believe some were. I remember they were talking about overpopulation and letting prisoners go but I don't remember who they let out and if it was drug offenses but it should have been.
 

Khasm13

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Mar 26, 2003
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Also some people automatically experienced this. A few people I know had felonies for possession and they dropped them to misdemeanors when the law changed. I think some misdemeanors were also dropped automatically. It depends what you got caught with. Less than an ounce and you're golden. It sucks for people who are locked up for it though. I'm not sure how many/or if any were released for minor drug cases but I believe some were. I remember they were talking about overpopulation and letting prisoners go but I don't remember who they let out and if it was drug offenses but it should have been.


yeah to me it's just another example of a system that was never meant to benefit the majority of black people...only the chosen few...that article was a great piece thought....

one love
kkasm
 

Khasm13

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MODERATOR
Mar 26, 2003
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A Tech Insider article reports that while the legal marijuana industry is making big money nationwide, African-Americans aren’t getting a large share of this boom. 2015 marks the largest increase yet in sales for the legal pot market. Sales have increased 15% to $5.4 billion, higher than the e-cigarettes market and the Girl Scouts combined. With further trends towards legalization, the industry could possibly reach $21 billion and $44 billion by 2020.

One issue here, though, according to an investigative report by Amanda Chicago Lewis from Buzzfeed, is that African-Americans only own 1% of these marijuana dispensaries, shutting them out from the “green rush.” Lewis notes that while there aren’t any official statistics out regarding race and ownership of dispensaries, she interviewed over 150 people involved in the industry as a part of her report. She found that out of the 3,200 to 3,600 dispensaries in the U.S, black people owned fewer than three dozen of them.

This industry-wide issue extends beyond just ownership, but towards other aspects of the legalization movement as well. In her report, Lewis notes that industry-related events and press coverage often have very little representation from African-Americans.



http://financialjuneteenth.com/1-marijuana-dispensaries-owned-african-americans-says-new-report/
 

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