Black People : The Hip Hop Conspiracy.

bigtown

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jun 3, 2004
836
31
Before I go further I must say that my post is not about the unfortunate Tupac, Notorious B.I.G. affair. It's about hip hop in the aspect of what is was, how and why it has become what it is today. It's also about how it's used to influence the black culture in America. I'm a child of the hip hop culture, it was once my music of choice over all others. When hip hop was in it's infancy, most of the music was non political for the most part, party music. Hip hop in the eighties became more socially conscious however, with Grand master flash, “don't push me cuz I'm close to the edge, I'm trying not to loose my head” was the famous hook. The genre began to speak out against the federal government and the prison system. Drugs in the community, police abuse, and black empowerment were also popular themes for groups like Public Enemy and for KRS1.
The genre introduced us to beautiful strong female rappers with songs like U.N.I.T.Y. The music videos featured women that were beautiful and sexy while being fully dressed. The genre respected women in the community with songs like LL cool jays “around the way girl” During this artistitic, political, and socially conscious evolution of hip hop media, the media and white people in America became very interested in it. The artists began speaking out publicly using their own voices, not rapping, to bring certain cultural and social issues to the forefront. People were starting to listen, closely to these young intelligent black men and women. The government knew this genre was getting an audience and could lead to a movement, or worse a revolution if enough people heard and more importantly, believed in it's message. It was starting to open the eyes of the most dangerous members of the black race. The young. Which meant if a movement happened, it could be a problem for a very long time, possibly forever. The government could not have something so potentially powerful in the black culture speaking out against injustice and promoting peace in the black community.
The government chose 2 live crew first, assuming it's sleazy lyrics and raunchy live performances would make it easier to eventually pursue the true targets. However, to the astonishment of the United States government, it lost it's case against 2 live crew. 2 live crew used the United States Constitution to use sleazy lyrics in their music and make women in their videos look mindless and sleazy and the men like no-good oversexed negroids . The genre as a whole however, was still very politcal and socially conscious, therefore still influencing it's listeners (young black people). The government knew that it was potentially a threat in it's present form. It could not allow that. The government decided it would change the genre, since it could not get rid of it. The government needed to turn the genre into something less political, less socially conscious, less respectful to black women. Overall something less threatening.
2 live crew, ironically became it's blue print for this plan. The government began using it's propaganda machine, the media, to begin pushing the more negative violent aspects of hip hop for young black men to idolize. The ideology became f**k a nine to five, stack your paper while you live in the ghetto with your flashy cars while you drink champagne in the VIP. The new ideology of hip hop also began viewing black women as mere mindless objects for men's pleasure. They were no longer on equal standing. The socially conscious artists which once dominated the genre were pushed to the background until they ultimately began to disappear. The media began going after protest songs like “Cop killa” while almost completely ignoring songs that overtly referenced killing other human beings, in an attempt to further change the philosophy of hip hop. The governments' propaganda machine embarrassed and harassed the record labels also into pushing the new ideology for the hip hop genre.
Today, Rap has evolved into something that many of it's forefathers are somewhat disappointed in but will not admit publicly out of respect for the genre. I personally don't have a problem with rap, since I mostly view it as a modern day “step and fetchit” show, therefore not worth my attention. My problem lies mostly with black people, because black people allowed something so powerful and so influencial in so many good ways to the culture to be manipulated into becoming a mere minstrel show. Today the only good thing you can say about hip hop is that it makes money. Many people argue that hip hop is an art. In 1987 photographer Andres Sarrano debuted Piss Christ. It depicted a small plastic crucifix submerged in a glass of the photographers own urine. That's also considered art to some people.
 

Putney Swope

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jun 27, 2009
1,355
136
Absolutely true......

Before I go further I must say that my post is not about the unfortunate Tupac, Notorious B.I.G. affair. It's about hip hop in the aspect of what is was, how and why it has become what it is today. It's also about how it's used to influence the black culture in America. I'm a child of the hip hop culture, it was once my music of choice over all others. When hip hop was in it's infancy, most of the music was non political for the most part, party music. Hip hop in the eighties became more socially conscious however, with Grand master flash, “don't push me cuz I'm close to the edge, I'm trying not to loose my head” was the famous hook. The genre began to speak out against the federal government and the prison system. Drugs in the community, police abuse, and black empowerment were also popular themes for groups like Public Enemy and for KRS1.
The genre introduced us to beautiful strong female rappers with songs like U.N.I.T.Y. The music videos featured women that were beautiful and sexy while being fully dressed. The genre respected women in the community with songs like LL cool jays “around the way girl” During this artistitic, political, and socially conscious evolution of hip hop media, the media and white people in America became very interested in it. The artists began speaking out publicly using their own voices, not rapping, to bring certain cultural and social issues to the forefront. People were starting to listen, closely to these young intelligent black men and women. The government knew this genre was getting an audience and could lead to a movement, or worse a revolution if enough people heard and more importantly, believed in it's message. It was starting to open the eyes of the most dangerous members of the black race. The young. Which meant if a movement happened, it could be a problem for a very long time, possibly forever. The government could not have something so potentially powerful in the black culture speaking out against injustice and promoting peace in the black community.
The government chose 2 live crew first, assuming it's sleazy lyrics and raunchy live performances would make it easier to eventually pursue the true targets. However, to the astonishment of the United States government, it lost it's case against 2 live crew. 2 live crew used the United States Constitution to use sleazy lyrics in their music and make women in their videos look mindless and sleazy and make the men look like no-good oversexed negroids . The genre as a whole however, was still very politcal and socially conscious, therefore still influencing it's listeners (young black people). The government knew that it was potentially a threat in it's present form. It could not allow that. The government decided it would change the genre, since it could not get rid of it. The government needed to turn the genre into something less political, less socially conscious, less respectful to black women. Overall something less threatening.
2 live crew, ironically became it's blue print for this plan. The government began using it's propaganda machine, the media, to begin pushing the more negative violent aspects of hip hop for young black men to idolize. The ideology became f**k a nine to five, stack your paper while you live in the ghetto with your flashy cars while you drink champagne in the VIP. The new ideology of hip hop also began viewing black women as mere mindless objects for men's pleasure. They were no longer on equal standing. The socially conscious artists which once dominated the genre were pushed to the background until they ultimately began to disappear. The media began going after protest songs like “Cop killa” while almost completely ignoring songs that overtly referenced killing other human beings, in an attempt to further change the philosophy of hip hop. The governments' propaganda machine embarrassed and harassed the record labels also into pushing the new ideology for the hip hop genre.
Today, Rap has evolved into something that many of it's forefathers are somewhat disappointed in but will not admit publicly out of respect for the genre. I personally don't have a problem with rap, since I mostly view it as a modern day “step and fetchit” show, therefore not worth my attention. My problem lies mostly with black people, because black people allowed something so powerful and so influencial in so many good ways to the culture to be manipulated into becoming a mere minstrel show. Today the only good thing you can say about hip hop is that it makes money. Many people argue that hip hop is an art. In 1987 photographer Andres Sarrano debuted Piss Christ. It depicted a small plastic crucifix submerged in a glass of the photographers own urine. That's also considered art to some people.

When the Beatles and the Rolling Stone started to stray from thier "Black music as , they put it" R and B,
and got more stoned and high, from substances unnamed and provided by "friends" ,
Tavistock came in and introduced necrotic ideologies , tonal structures and satanism in some instances.
There has always been manipulation to psychologicaly enslave those seeking freedom, after Kennedy's assasination.
When Lennon broke out from the programming, aligned with Bobby Seale and promoted hippies to register to vote,
he was taken out!!!!!!!!

Arrested Development, Professor Griff, Paris, Sistah Souljah, Immortal Technique, and KRS 1 are strategicaly placed as persona non grata,
on air waves "easily" available to the nations Black youth.

Hence the greater urgency for us to purchase our own airways and develop our own itune type programs as well.
 

chuck

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 9, 2003
13,471
2,160
Compromising with corrupt corporate interests did them in:

And anybody trying to prop up a decadent world order can't even guaratee their own survival anymore!

Just ask Obama...

:SuN020:
 

chuck

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 9, 2003
13,471
2,160
I feel and think both of you are blurring the distinction between ARTISTS and ENTERTAINERS...

Among the first type come the activists and the theorists...

Not usually among the second type...

FYI...

:SuN020:
 

Putney Swope

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jun 27, 2009
1,355
136
I feel and think both of you are blurring the distinction between ARTISTS and ENTERTAINERS...

Among the first type come the activists and the theorists...

Not usually among the second type...

FYI...

:SuN020:
why did I start thinking of Shrek all of a sudden?
 

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