Omowale Jabali : Strange Fruit From The Family Tree

Omowale Jabali

The Cosmic Journeyman
PREMIUM MEMBER
Sep 29, 2005
20,817
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Temple of Kali, Yubaland
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Creative Industrialist

Omowale Jabali

The Cosmic Journeyman
PREMIUM MEMBER
Sep 29, 2005
20,817
9,452
Temple of Kali, Yubaland
Occupation
Creative Industrialist
I have spent over 20 years researching all sides of my family history. I know. Some of you have heard or read about this before. In the course of this research, I have had to accept some disturbing facts. Mostly related to the legacy of slavery. Yeah. Here we go again. Not really though. This post is a little different. Its about one slave master in particular who shows up in my family tree. After all these years, I can no longer ignore him or pretend he does not exist. I discovered him recently while digging through my Louisiana roots. As I was searching through the records for a branch of my family named "St.Martin", I was led to some Louisiana Slave Records, which opened the door that I was searching for. The path through Saint Dominique (prior to the Haitian Revolution) back to the Congo. The deeper I go into the path, the more that is revealed to me, so please excuse me if I seem "strange" to you.

It gets stranger. Researching my St.Martin lineage led me back to Mozambique, Mauritius and Trinidad as well.

The oldest blood ties on my tree of the Louisiana settlers goes back to the Rivards dit Lavigne.

Perhaps the most notorious is Antoine Rivard dit Lavigne who I recently found was a captain on a slave ship, Duc du Maine which carried what may be the first west Central Africans from St Helena to Martinique, arriving at Dauphine Island on Jan. 14, 1727. An earlier voyage on June 6, 1719 brought slaves to Louisiana (or Dauphine Is.)from Senegambia.


The enslavement of Indians was practiced among native groups, and from the beginning of the colonial period, Indian slaves became part of the European colonial economy. In 1708 about 80 Indian slaves labored in the few Mobile Bay settlements. By 1726 this number had increased to 110, but a few years later, it had declined to 37 Indian slaves. A few black slaves were in the French colony prior to the first slave ships arriving at Dauphin Island in June 1719 with 450 enslaved Africans. Over the next 15 years, approximately 7,000 African slaves were shipped to French Louisiana. Slaves were involved with most economic activities on colonial plantations, primarily agricultural and livestock tending, and skills such as blacksmithing and brickmaking.
http://trails.mdah.ms.gov/krebs_culture.htm


The third voyage (Voyage 33116) under Capt. A. de Lavigne carried slaves from West Central Africa and St. Helena to Martinique, arriving Jan. 14, 1727. Of 491 slaves, 431 were alive to disembark at Martinique. 42 out of 91 crew members died en route.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duc_du_Maine_(slave_ship)
 

Omowale Jabali

The Cosmic Journeyman
PREMIUM MEMBER
Sep 29, 2005
20,817
9,452
Temple of Kali, Yubaland
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Creative Industrialist
More on the slave ship Duc du Maine.


The first documented slave voyage (Voyage 32884) was in 1719 under Capt. de Lauduoine.[3] began at Port Louis. Slaves were purchased at Whydah, and landed at Biloxi.[3] Other sources state that after three months at sea, the first landing occurred at Dauphin Island with 250 slaves.[1][2] The voyage ended in Lorient.[3]

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duc_du_Maine_(slave_ship)


The Kingdom of Whydah /ˈhwɪdə/, sometimes written Hueda, was a kingdom on the coast of West Africa in the boundaries of the modern nation of Benin. Between 1677 and 1681 it was conquered by the Akwamu a member of the Akan people.[1] It was a major slave trading post. Of 1700, it had a coastline of around 10 miles (16 km);[2] under King Haffon, this was expanded to 40 miles (64 km), and stretching 25 miles (40 km) inland.[3]

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingdom_of_Whydah
 

Omowale Jabali

The Cosmic Journeyman
PREMIUM MEMBER
Sep 29, 2005
20,817
9,452
Temple of Kali, Yubaland
Occupation
Creative Industrialist
The Serpent Cult at Whydah


The destruction of Whydah as a Kingdom did not put an end to the veneration of the serpent there. According to William Davaynes, who was one of the directors of the East India Company and who had left the Coast of Africa in 1763 after having resided there twelve years, eleven years as Governor at Whydah and the other at Annamboe, "The snake was the peculiar worship of the ancient people of Whydah, and when this province was conquered by the King of Dahomey, the worship of the snake was continued upon motives of policy. Formerly a person who killed a snake was put to death; but now a goat is sacrificed as an atonement."[31] The last statement must apply to the case of Europeans alone, for as we shall see the death penalty against...
http://www.sacred-texts.com/afr/vao/vao04.htm
 
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