Black People : Not All Of Us Are Gonna Make It

Kemetstry

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Feb 19, 2001
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revisionist history maybe....
next time come with some facts before u say someone is wrong son....

one love
khasm


This is obvious





..
 

Orisons

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:)
No, Orisons, I don't feel emasculated. I'm a woman, bro:cheerleader:
So is Dr Frances Cress-Welsing [has complained more than once about allegedly prominent males in our community hiding asking her advice with regard to the WAR we’re in as opposed to standing up/organizing and protecting] and Marimba Ani [have you read their works] but there is a more comprehensive rationally assertive focus with regard to providing the tools of the African Renaissance in the 21st century in their books than in any Black male author that I’ve read, thus can I change emasculation in my question to “ashamed/CRUSHED”?

We *both* can have valid points about the history *and the people* who were the original Black Wall Streeters. Truth is, we seem to see the significance of the Greenwood folks and the tragedy that they lived through quite differently.

It happened, though. It was EVIL. Yet that murderous riot didn't leave them without options affording them to re-set, get their lives back in gear, and thereafter to prosper again.

Not *all of them* that lost all that they did, but many Greenwood families and businesses eventually *overcame* in the end.

One Love, and PEACE [/quote]My point is that isn’t it very obvious as exemplified by just how successful the Black Wall Street was within the legal framework/fundamentally hostile status quo that it had to be destroyed by military force, underline exactly why it is still a valid template for the organisation of our communities within the USA and the rest of the Diaspora and even more critically our countries in Africa, in the 21st century?

Isn’t ANYONE who genuinely believes they are not programmed
graphically illustrating that their programming is COMPLETE?

 

Fieldpea

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So is Dr Frances Cress-Welsing [has complained more than once about allegedly prominent males in our community hiding asking her advice with regard to the WAR we’re in as opposed to standing up/organizing and protecting] and Marimba Ani [have you read their works] but there is a more comprehensive rationally assertive focus with regard to providing the tools of the African Renaissance in the 21st century in their books than in any Black male author that I’ve read, thus can I change emasculation in my question to “ashamed/CRUSHED”? Well, 'No, Sir', you may not--at least, not where I'm concerned. I'm neither ashamed nor crushed. If anything, figure me to be *shameless*--though I can admit that I am working on repairing my shame-thing.



I first learned about Marimba Ani's work in some forum *here* maybe a year or two ago. I just purchased Yurugu, and I intend to get to it real soon. The same is true with regards to Dr. Cress-Welsing's book, 'The Isis Papers'--bought both books at the same time. I may as well add: In the same batch purchase from Amazon, I bought Dr. Wilson's 'Falsification...', Dr. ben-Jochannan's Black Man/Nile', Wayne Chandler's 'Ancient Future' (a re-purchase of a stolen book that I just loaned to my oldest son last week), Stephen Gould's 'Mismeasure...', and I intend to replace a few more lost books that I used to own back in the day (mostly history), but I intend to get Malidoma Some's 'Of Water...' and 'Ritual...', too, come January.


I also intend to print out Blackroots Science's stuff (I bought a half-ream of paper, a Canon multi-function printer, a 3-ring binder and a 3-hole punch just so that I can *make a book* of his materials that are still available online)--his stuff, and any other stuff online that I can amass that I believe worthy of study. I am particularly interested in Blackroot's formal presentation, but also *his responses* to questions online. I even ordered a subscription of the OED online (so that I have access to a definitive English dictionary), and I ordered Rosetta Stone (5 disc set) so that I can 'finally' master espanol (many classes later, I still can't speak the language). It looms as a failed academic challenge for me, so...


We *both* can have valid points about the history *and the people* who were the original Black Wall Streeters. Truth is, we seem to see the significance of the Greenwood folks and the tragedy that they lived through quite differently.

It happened, though. It was EVIL. Yet that murderous riot didn't leave them without options affording them to re-set, get their lives back in gear, and thereafter to prosper again.

Not *all of them* that lost all that they did, but many Greenwood families and businesses eventually *overcame* in the end.

One Love, and PEACE
My point is that isn’t it very obvious as exemplified by just how successful the Black Wall Street was within the legal framework/fundamentally hostile status quo that it had to be destroyed by military force, underline exactly why it is still a valid template for the organisation of our communities within the USA and the rest of the Diaspora and even more critically our countries in Africa, in the 21st century?


OK. Two things.


Orisons, back in the mid-70s, I took a Black American history course from a man named Dr. Robert Nesby at ASU (Arizona State Univ). I bring him up because of what I think you and I have been doing with our dialogue. Our seeming to 'miss each other's points' reminds me of Dr. Nesby's final--how he crafted that final.


First, it was a 192 question, multiple choice test. 192 of them. All questions were purely based on his lectures and ALL of the books and pamphlets and handouts that he required that we students read and understand. Dr. Nesby told all of us students that with his final, EVERY CHOICE listed for each multiple choice question on his Black History final was *true*. ALL OF THEM. He gave us one week to figure out which possible choice for each question was the MOST TRUE, historically.


Dr. Nesby was demanding that we students recognize 'which possible response' represented the OVERARCHING, true response. Each true option was formatted as (A), (B), (C), or (D). There were NO *none of the above* options, because three of the responses were true *to a certain extent*, historically, but only ONE response was *most true*.


What's *most true* out of all of the possible permutations' worth of responses that you OR I can come up with? IONO. But I do feel like neither of us is wrong. We just weigh what's valuable (the possible lessons) differently, yet without ignoring what we might otherwise see as the *obvious stuff* regarding the 'available lessons', past to present. I'm describing *subjectivity* being in play. This is why our back and forth reminds me of that long ago final exam.


In regards to what you've posted above? OK, I'd like to respond to what you've said:


So is Dr Frances Cress-Welsing [has complained more than once about allegedly prominent males in our community hiding asking her advice with regard to the WAR we’re in as opposed to standing up/organizing and protecting] and Marimba Ani [have you read their works] but there is a more comprehensive rationally assertive focus with regard to providing the tools of the African Renaissance in the 21st century in their books than in any Black male author that I’ve read,...


Isn’t ANYONE who genuinely believes they are not programmed
graphically illustrating that their programming is COMPLETE?


Both Sisters have said this, huh? I think it a *good thing* that these brothers know to ask them for their considered advice. They have the solid reputations for being *forefront scholars* in regards to parsing the roots/nature of structurally implemented global racism, and the effects of racism, too, on Afrikan peoples.


Also, we lost Dr. Wilson, so...


Greenwood as a valid template, organizationally? ABSOLUTELY! I think folks would be outright *amazed* as to the size of them Negro folkses 'cajones' in the face of the threat of *discovery* regarding some of the schemes they got away with, and ALL in order to bring about the uplift of the Negro community in Phoenix. They were straight 'off the chain' aggressive. Missioned. Committed, big time. Had to be.


Major, sustained *uplift* don't happen without people being willing to really take risks, sometimes, plus needing to manage powerful feelings of fear associated with such risk-taking.


It took a few years to put into place--to put the right people in place--but by the 1930s, their sneaky system was already headed toward being the *well oiled machine* that they wanted.


One Love, and PEACE
 

Orisons

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Where did I express [in my questions below, are you going to answer them] any wonder with regard to what the GAP community’s still wealthy descendents are doing with their wealth whereas isn’t the issue here just how poorly organised and led many of our communities in the USA, UK and the rest of the Diaspora are TODAY, especially in comparison to other ethnic groups [many of whom have come into the country after us], or don’t you think that the Boulé dominated AUTOMATONS we’re afflicted with are easily the most inept lobby within the USA with regard to securing our best interests [especially in comparison to the Jews, WASPS, Italians even Greeks and Asians]? Are YOU going to address the underlined section of my question?

Aren’t YOU as ashamed/CRUSHED as I to have to publicly concede that I truly cannot name ANY African leader who has done as much for Africa over the last 500 years as Muamar Gaddafi, an Arab [whereas don’t we have to get our act together], can you?
:) No, Orisons, I don't feel emasculated. I'm a woman, bro.
So is Dr Frances Cress-Welsing [has complained more than once about allegedly prominent males in our community hiding asking her advice with regard to the WAR we’re in as opposed to standing up/organizing and protecting] and Marimba Ani [have you read their works] but there is a more comprehensive rationally assertive focus with regard to providing the tools of the African Renaissance in the 21st century in their books than in any Black male author that I’ve read, thus can I change emasculation in my question to “ashamed/CRUSHED”?
We *both* can have valid points about the history *and the people* who were the original Black Wall Streeters. Truth is, we seem to see the significance of the Greenwood folks and the tragedy that they lived through quite differently.
Well, 'No, Sir', you may not--at least, not where I'm concerned. I'm neither ashamed nor crushed. If anything, figure me to be *shameless*--though I can admit that I am working on repairing my shame-thing.
Though on an individual level we have nothing to be ashamed off, isn’t failure to create intelligently organised and led collective units in a world where the WINNERS are as standard, a 100% guarantee of your VICTIM IN WAITING status, who wont have to wait long [whereas as highlighted by Iraq, Libya, Syria TODAY and what the EVIL intend to do to Iran even being intelligently organized and led but not having the BIG STICK/WMD’s while sitting on strategically vital land/resources is fatal too, isn’t it?
It happened, though. It was EVIL.
Yet that murderous riot didn't leave them without options affording them to re-set, get their lives back in gear, and thereafter to prosper again.

Not *all of them* that lost all that they did, but many Greenwood families and businesses eventually *overcame* in the end.

One Love, and PEACE
My point is that isn’t it very obvious as exemplified by just how successful the Black Wall Street was within the legal framework/fundamentally hostile status quo that it had to be destroyed by military force, underline exactly why it is still a valid template for the organisation of our communities within the USA and the rest of the Diaspora and even more critically our countries in Africa, in the 21st century?
I think it a *good thing* that these brothers know to ask them for their considered advice.
They have the solid reputations for being *forefront scholars* in regards to parsing the roots/nature of structurally implemented global racism, and the effects of racism, too, on Afrikan peoples.

Also, we lost Dr. Wilson, so...

Greenwood as a valid template, organizationally? ABSOLUTELY! I think folks would be outright *amazed* as to the size of them Negro folkses 'cajones' in the face of the threat of *discovery* regarding some of the schemes they got away with, and ALL in order to bring about the uplift of the Negro community in Phoenix. They were straight 'off the chain' aggressive. Missioned. Committed, big time. Had to be.

Major, sustained *uplift* don't happen without people being willing to really take risks, sometimes, plus needing to manage powerful feelings of fear associated with such risk-taking.

It took a few years to put into place--to put the right people in place--but by the 1930s, their sneaky system was already headed toward being the *well oiled machine* that they wanted.

One Love, and PEACE
Now can you relate to why I’m striving to get the Boulé dominated AUTOMATONS we’re currently afflicted with and the REAL thinkers/would be leaders in our commumities and countries [like those in this online discussion group Self-Help News LET US REASON TOGETHER: AFRIKA AND DIASPORA GLOBAL LEADERSHIPS DEBATE 201]to adopt the Black Wall Street’s proven template to create the African Renaissance in the 21st century as opposed to constantly searching around/attempting to re-invent the wheel?

Isn’t ANYONE who genuinely believes they are not programmed
graphically illustrating that their programming is COMPLETE?
 

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