Amun-Ra : New Threat?

Sekhemu

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LMAO,

Amun-Ra "where did all these white women with ***** come from?--overnight,"
True indeed!
 

Amun-Ra

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I post them so we can comment

Why doesn't anyone comment on the content--you don't like the message--give a better message--is everyone afraid of the message? Do they feel that it doesn't need to be commented upon? Hiding our heads in the sand makes it go away? I have been appalled by the lack of women willing to stand up and address the issue itself--of course I expected no reply from black men, but I did expect women to stand up with more than "they don't like the topic." I never back away from a controversial subject because I don't like it. I have no use for the Ku Klux Klan, never had and never will, but I can discuss it, I can dismantle it, I can even ridicule it, but I am not afraid of the subject.

Are we so snowed that we don't think these things are every day issues? Or, are we afraid of defending black women because not everyone will agree withour defense? News flash! Everyone won't agree with your defense, but it will be an honest assessment and it yours to boot.

In the future I will not post such things that require comment that every doesn't agree with--I'll make like these things aren't said or done and do the commenting or dismantling of these issues myself, apart and away from this page.

I will post only topics that we can all agree upon and not go against the grain for those who are quick to decry, but aren't so quick to present well reasoned, logical, positive defenses of what should be something that is easy to debunk. Still, I will respect that even though I don't agree with it. I will not bother to provoke thought on subjects no one wants to think about. The role of the devil's advocate is not appreciated here, so I will cease.

:devil:
 

Mahogany_Brown

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I'm not even sure if I want to get involved in this conversation, but personally I did not see this particular thread/topic as being disrespectful to Black women. In my understanding the thread was mostly based on how the media displays specific views(stereotypes) of Black women and many times we as Black women ourselves(as well as Black men ) have taken on these views(stereotypes). It does seem that alot of what Amun Ra has said in this thread is real. It seems that an increasing nuber of Black men are interacting with women from other racial backgrounds(however this has been happening for generations) and I have seen an increasing Asian presence among Black men in the media( ex.videos) and I'm sure in the general population as well. The stereotype of an Asian woman( and I'm mostly concentrating on women who are Chinese, Japanese, etc..) is someone who is petite, obeys her mate/husband ex..geisha girl, and also a woman who knows her place in the home. To some men these stereotypes of Asian women are desirable and would lead them to think of the Asian woman as being feminine. Some things can be painful, but are we here to make each other only feel good or are we here to face certain issues even when they are uncomfortable and shouldn't seeking truth be the objective? I'm aware that no one asked me for my opinion, but I guess I wanted to add my own views anyway.
 

Destee

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Amun-Ra ... with so many wounds that need to be healed, you stab us with a knife (post white folks negative studies of us as though it is truth) just to see how quickly the new wound heals or how many come to help stop the bleeding. You say you expected no Brothers to come to our aid, but you did expect us to fight back better than we have. You knew a defense would be required.

Gosh. You just don't get it. This is not the place we come to fight, and certainly not each other over what white folk say about us. This is our refuge, a place where we can build together, not fight imaginary battles based on what other people think of us. It is so time out for even caring what they think of us! It is time for us to focus on how we think of each other and how to heal the damage caused by conditioning / studies that have left us thinking the worst of ourselves.

You are obviously sure, confident and secure in who you are and what you've accomplished, and only sticks and stones can break your bones, but all of us are not there yet. Do you realize we have Sisters and Brothers hurting mentally, physically, spiritually, psychologically? Do you know this, do you care? This community is here to provide an escape from the continuous assaults on our being. A place where we can find peace and encouragement from our own folk ... and here you are throwing rocks at us, waiting to see who says, "ouch."

White folk and all their racist studies, or Black folk who present them as truth can hardly be considered "New Threats." It's business as usual.

Destee
 

PurpleMoons

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As an African women I must say that I am proud of me. I love who I am and who most of us are. We are beautiful. we are smart. We are feminine. We are a force that all would like to understand. our strength has been passed down from generation to generation. If a black man does'nt find our being pleasant or suitable, I say the issues lies within himself. It is his image that he's so willing to erase. I know for a fact that there are many white men, asian men that dream of encounters will black women but unlike some black men they remain true to their own. They support each other. There is no need for me to defend who I am or why black men choose to date or marry outside of their race. I'm beautiful and no one will ever convince me that I am anything less or that I have a problem being the beautiful black me! It's not an issue to debate when you know your own selfworth but it hurts to hear that our men would put others on such a pedestal without any regards to the women who helped make and mode them into the black men that they are.
 

Sekhemu

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I have tend to agree with much of what Mahogany says here. However a few other people have made some valid points as well. Much of what Amun-Ra says in the thread is very well known and perhaps he is guilty of re-hashing information already known. However he does postulate a few points that we may not be taken into consideration. And I do agree that we need to challenge the images and perceptions that we help re-inforce or are complicit in allowing to continue by staying silent. Perception in many cases is reality. Working around Yte people shows me what they think of us and how they percieve us, based on stereo-types and their very limited interaction with us, outside the work place. I believe the most constructive thing we can do is not support any images, forms of communication, products and groups that denegrate and malign the image of black women, or men for that matter. Naturally this would include SOME hair care products, skin whitners, CD's and videos, columnist, et al.
 

Amun-Ra

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Stereotypes

I do not care for stereotypes and I don't care much for the people who believe them--any of them. We can be secure in ourselves and our own self worth and I certainly salute all who have found that within themselves because that much is needed just to face the world, but I worry that we don't call down the offenders in our community who help perpetuate those stereotypes. (too many videos and music portraying black women as--hoes, etc.) That's a weak one, but those videos and music are also embraced by white as well as blacks and unfortunately, that is how some view out women when it is a far cry from the truth. I am aware of groups of black women fighting these images, but it seems that not much can be done in the face of unlimited dollars.

Ra

:cool:
 

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