Black Muslims : Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide

Keita Kenyatta

going above and beyond
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Feb 7, 2004
5,631
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The Reckoning

What Blacks Owe to Each Other

As a follow-up to The Debt: What America Owes to Blacks, Randall Robinson makes the compelling case that at the same time that African Americans push for reparations, they must simultaneously fight another equally important battle against the growing prison industrial system that is as ominous a development for black and brown Americans as the slave trade was for the people of Africa between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. Tragically, African Americans have been and continue to be overwhelmingly thrown into new prisons-for-profit, increasingly built and run by corporations. Robinson argues that blacks owe it to each other to expose and dismantle this phenomenon because the repercussions, not only to those actually imprisoned, but for the entire black community, are frighteningly multidimensional and intergenerational.
The Reckoning grew out of Robinson’s work with gang members, ex-convicts, and others profoundly scarred by environments of extreme poverty. It pays homage to the residents of these neighborhoods waging heroic struggles to save their communities, and holds up for public examination America’s elected officials joining with corporate America to make private-sector prisons a twenty-first-century growth industry.
Author photo:
Willets Photo Studio, St. Kitts
About the Author

Randall Robinson is the author of MAKEDA, An Unbroken Agony and the national best sellers The Debt, The Reckoning, Quitting America, and Defending the Spirit, as well as the novel The Emancipation of Wakefield Clay. He is a professor of law at Penn State Law School and is the creator, co-producer, and host of the public television human rights series World on Trial. Robinson lives with his wife Hazel in St. Kitts, West Indies.

http://www.randallrobinson.com/reckoning.html

Here's the tragic part. I personally know of Black people who have invested in prison privatization. What does this mean? It means that we already have black politicians and so called leaders who are and have invested in the death of who we are as a people. I personally came up with a program that would merge the youth and the elders of our community together in a learning process whereby the gap between the old and young would be bridged in terms of them passing what skills they had down to the youth. When I went to the city council meeting about it, they told me,"Oh, we already had 20 million in funding for such a project". I asked them; "what happened to it"? They replied; They sat on it until the grant time ran out and sent it back".

I was never so pissed in my life!!!! I knew then that there was never going to be any intent to clean up anything in our communities because to do so was to take money out of the pockets of the people who had invested in the prison systems....and yes, there's a whole lot of our own people invested in it! Our youth and other black people ain't nothing but a dollar bill in somebody's pocket and you'd be surprised by how many of them are black that are lining their pockets with the blood of our people! All the gun violence, the drugs, the gangs, the school dropouts and all else is something that no one invested in that system wants to stop. It's on Wallstreet and yes, once again...our own BLACK people are invested in it!! In the words of Sister Souljah: "I got eyes so I can see, and my eyes don't play tricks on me!"
 

Kadijah

Banned
MEMBER
Apr 7, 2013
6,131
2,927
.Who is going to appeal to predisent Obama about this issue? And what can he do if we are still doing what racist have deceived us to do and end up in the prisons? This is called 'a bait and switch system, and I beleive we don't recognize this too, and then our people just stand by and do nothing-- not realizing this kind of situation damages the whole.

.
I know I'm going to get flamed, but -

Who is going to appeal to president Bush about this issue?

We might as well appeal to him, or to any white president, as to president Obama. We'll get the same result. Look at what happened when his friend, the respected professor Louis Gates was locked up, finger-printed and mug shot for trying to enter his own house. The racist policeman got a free trip to the White House where he got to sip brewskis with the president in the beautiful Rose Garden.

We're not gay and we're not illegal so we're not a high priority for the country or for our black president. It's like the title of the thread says - Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide. We've got to start making some noise.

I am in total agreement with this sig line:

The Only Friends That We Have Are Ourselves...And Anytime We Are Not About Ourselves As A People, Then We're About Somebody Other Than Us.

It's up to us to save us.
 

noor100

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 17, 2010
1,037
564
I know I'm going to get flamed, but -

Who is going to appeal to president Bush about this issue?

We might as well appeal to him, or to any white president, as to president Obama. We'll get the same result. Look at what happened when his friend, the respected professor Louis Gates was locked up, finger-printed and mug shot for trying to enter his own house. The racist policeman got a free trip to the White House where he got to sip brewskis with the president in the beautiful Rose Garden.

We're not gay and we're not illegal so we're not a high priority for the country or for our black president. It's like the title of the thread says - Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide. We've got to start making some noise.

I am in total agreement with this sig line:

The Only Friends That We Have Are Ourselves...And Anytime We Are Not About Ourselves As A People, Then We're About Somebody Other Than Us.

It's up to us to save us.

Why would you get flamed for speaking the truth? I agree with you...I don't see much difference in Bush/Obama policies. Many people seem blind to this so I try to avoid politics. But sometimes I have to say something.
 

chuck

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 9, 2003
13,471
2,159
CD I have a copy of Michelle Alexander's book. It is an eyeopener. The president should be concerned...but is he:(
It shouldn't be up to even the first african american president to decide what our agendas should be and/or what we should actually do about our peoples issues/problems/etc.

FYI...
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Nov 17, 2006
53,425
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Speaker/Teacher/Author


The Reckoning


What Blacks Owe to Each Other

As a follow-up to The Debt: What America Owes to Blacks, Randall Robinson makes the compelling case that at the same time that African Americans push for reparations, they must simultaneously fight another equally important battle against the growing prison industrial system that is as ominous a development for black and brown Americans as the slave trade was for the people of Africa between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. Tragically, African Americans have been and continue to be overwhelmingly thrown into new prisons-for-profit, increasingly built and run by corporations. Robinson argues that blacks owe it to each other to expose and dismantle this phenomenon because the repercussions, not only to those actually imprisoned, but for the entire black community, are frighteningly multidimensional and intergenerational.
The Reckoning grew out of Robinson’s work with gang members, ex-convicts, and others profoundly scarred by environments of extreme poverty. It pays homage to the residents of these neighborhoods waging heroic struggles to save their communities, and holds up for public examination America’s elected officials joining with corporate America to make private-sector prisons a twenty-first-century growth industry.
Author photo:
Willets Photo Studio, St. Kitts
About the Author

Randall Robinson is the author of MAKEDA, An Unbroken Agony and the national best sellers The Debt, The Reckoning, Quitting America, and Defending the Spirit, as well as the novel The Emancipation of Wakefield Clay. He is a professor of law at Penn State Law School and is the creator, co-producer, and host of the public television human rights series World on Trial. Robinson lives with his wife Hazel in St. Kitts, West Indies.

http://www.randallrobinson.com/reckoning.html


In the Spirit of Sankofa,



... Thanks for posting sister noor100, I don't have this one in my library, if you have it, how does Randall answer the issue he poses:

Robinson argues that blacks owe it to each other to expose and dismantle this phenomenon


What are some of his suggestions for dismantling that system?

Peace In,

 

chuck

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 9, 2003
13,471
2,159
Here's the tragic part. I personally know of Black people who have invested in prison privatization. What does this mean? It means that we already have black politicians and so called leaders who are and have invested in the death of who we are as a people. I personally came up with a program that would merge the youth and the elders of our community together in a learning process whereby the gap between the old and young would be bridged in terms of them passing what skills they had down to the youth. When I went to the city council meeting about it, they told me,"Oh, we already had 20 million in funding for such a project". I asked them; "what happened to it"? They replied; They sat on it until the grant time ran out and sent it back".

I was never so pissed in my life!!!! I knew then that there was never going to be any intent to clean up anything in our communities because to do so was to take money out of the pockets of the people who had invested in the prison systems....and yes, there's a whole lot of our own people invested in it! Our youth and other black people ain't nothing but a dollar bill in somebody's pocket and you'd be surprised by how many of them are black that are lining their pockets with the blood of our people! All the gun violence, the drugs, the gangs, the school dropouts and all else is something that no one invested in that system wants to stop. It's on Wallstreet and yes, once again...our own BLACK people are invested in it!! In the words of Sister Souljah: "I got eyes so I can see, and my eyes don't play tricks on me!"
There are some unsung heroes/sheroes/etc. attempting to bring about social and political reform inside of the system too...

Ms. Wallace's husband might be one of them....

I do recall she said he's a federal judge...

And, as my late mentor, James Boggs did put it, justice and freedom by all means necessary...

Otherwise, as per usual, some wind up becoming a part of the problem, by going along to get along, while others choose to be a part of the solution...

Let us not let the first get so easily off the hook and/or by default...

If nothing is expected or demanded, all we will get are more rhetoric/no action/etc. from our black elected officials....

That includes the guy presently in the Oval Office too....

FYI...
 

chuck

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 9, 2003
13,471
2,159
Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide


Tue, 04/02/2013 - 13:34 — Carl Dix

by Carl Dix
Michelle Alexander’s book The New Jim Crow takes us in the right direction to understanding mass incarceration – but it doesn’t go far enough. “It is essential to not fall into seeing the necessary resistance movement being a rerun of the movement that broke the back of Jim Crow.”

Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide
by Carl Dix
This article is a response to Bruce Dixon’s March 27 piece, “Black mass Incarceration – Is it New? Is it Jim Crow? …”
Genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages.”
Mass Incarceration is the 2.3 million people held in prisons across the country, almost 1 million of them Black and about another ½ million of them Latino. (This doesn’t count immigrants held in detention centers.) But it is also much more than that. It encompasses the 5 million formerly incarcerated people who are treated like 2nd class citizens despite having paid their “debt to society.” When you add to this the families and loved ones of all these people – because when someone goes to jail the lives of their whole family revolves around their incarceration – you have tens of millions of people forced to live their lives enmeshed in the web of the criminal injustice system.
The unjust incarceration of Black people on a mass scale is certainly not new. In addition to the post-Civil War Black Codes that Dixon cites (which were used to continue the enslavement of Black people under another name), incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century. (See Condemnation of Blackness by Khalil Gibran Muhammad) But as Dixon says, incarcerating this many people is unprecedented, not only in US history, but in world history.
Incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century.”
This mass incarceration amounts to a slow genocide targeting Black and Latino people. This is not exaggeration – it’s a scientific assessment. People being put in camps or marched to death chambers are final acts of genocide, but genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages. The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people. In his book, Drug Warriors and Their Prey: From Police Power to Police State, Richard Lawrence Miller identifies 5 stages of the process of genocide. 1) Identification. 2) Stigmatization. 3) Segregation. 4) Theft of property. 5) Extermination. He drew this off of a study of Nazi Germany’s handling of Jews during World War Two. There are likely to be variations in the process of genocide in other situations, but Black people have already been put through a number of these steps. And when you look at the way mass incarceration has already affected Black people (and Latinos as well) in the inner cities across the US, you see that a slow genocide is in progress, one that could easily be speeded up. (Developing this is outside the scope of this article, but consider the fact that for a sizeable section of the base of the Republican Party slavery is seen as a gift to African-Americans, and people without health insurance should be left to die.)
The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people.”
Why is this happening? Let’s pull back the lens and look at the larger picture. The skyrocketing incarceration rates in the US began in the 1970’s, in the aftermath of the urban rebellions of the 1960’s which spearheaded the development of a revolutionary movement that rocked the US government back on its heels, and as the process of searching for greater profit margins was driving the shift of manufacturing out of the US to countries around the world. From one end, the US rulers felt a need to exert greater control over Black youth to ensure they would not be in position to spark another round of uprisings and all that could mean. At the same time, the shift of manufacturing was leaving growing numbers of young Black people without legitimate means to survive and raise families.


http://blackagendareport.com/content/mass-incarceration-silence-genocide
What is required here: To read or reread the article the guest commentator is replying to as well...

FYI...

:thinking:
 

chuck

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 9, 2003
13,471
2,159
Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide


Tue, 04/02/2013 - 13:34 — Carl Dix

by Carl Dix
Michelle Alexander’s book The New Jim Crow takes us in the right direction to understanding mass incarceration – but it doesn’t go far enough. “It is essential to not fall into seeing the necessary resistance movement being a rerun of the movement that broke the back of Jim Crow.”

Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide
by Carl Dix
This article is a response to Bruce Dixon’s March 27 piece, “Black mass Incarceration – Is it New? Is it Jim Crow? …”
Genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages.”
Mass Incarceration is the 2.3 million people held in prisons across the country, almost 1 million of them Black and about another ½ million of them Latino. (This doesn’t count immigrants held in detention centers.) But it is also much more than that. It encompasses the 5 million formerly incarcerated people who are treated like 2nd class citizens despite having paid their “debt to society.” When you add to this the families and loved ones of all these people – because when someone goes to jail the lives of their whole family revolves around their incarceration – you have tens of millions of people forced to live their lives enmeshed in the web of the criminal injustice system.
The unjust incarceration of Black people on a mass scale is certainly not new. In addition to the post-Civil War Black Codes that Dixon cites (which were used to continue the enslavement of Black people under another name), incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century. (See Condemnation of Blackness by Khalil Gibran Muhammad) But as Dixon says, incarcerating this many people is unprecedented, not only in US history, but in world history.
Incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century.”
This mass incarceration amounts to a slow genocide targeting Black and Latino people. This is not exaggeration – it’s a scientific assessment. People being put in camps or marched to death chambers are final acts of genocide, but genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages. The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people. In his book, Drug Warriors and Their Prey: From Police Power to Police State, Richard Lawrence Miller identifies 5 stages of the process of genocide. 1) Identification. 2) Stigmatization. 3) Segregation. 4) Theft of property. 5) Extermination. He drew this off of a study of Nazi Germany’s handling of Jews during World War Two. There are likely to be variations in the process of genocide in other situations, but Black people have already been put through a number of these steps. And when you look at the way mass incarceration has already affected Black people (and Latinos as well) in the inner cities across the US, you see that a slow genocide is in progress, one that could easily be speeded up. (Developing this is outside the scope of this article, but consider the fact that for a sizeable section of the base of the Republican Party slavery is seen as a gift to African-Americans, and people without health insurance should be left to die.)
The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people.”
Why is this happening? Let’s pull back the lens and look at the larger picture. The skyrocketing incarceration rates in the US began in the 1970’s, in the aftermath of the urban rebellions of the 1960’s which spearheaded the development of a revolutionary movement that rocked the US government back on its heels, and as the process of searching for greater profit margins was driving the shift of manufacturing out of the US to countries around the world. From one end, the US rulers felt a need to exert greater control over Black youth to ensure they would not be in position to spark another round of uprisings and all that could mean. At the same time, the shift of manufacturing was leaving growing numbers of young Black people without legitimate means to survive and raise families.


http://blackagendareport.com/content/mass-incarceration-silence-genocide
What is required here: To read or reread the article the guest commentator is replying to as well...

FYI...

:thinking:
 

noor100

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 17, 2010
1,037
564
In the Spirit of Sankofa,



... Thanks for posting sister noor100, I don't have this one in my library, if you have it, how does Randall answer the issue he poses:

Robinson argues that blacks owe it to each other to expose and dismantle this phenomenon


What are some of his suggestions for dismantling that system?

Peace In,
Brother Clyde I don't have this book by Randall Robinson either but it would be very interesting to see what he says on this issue. I'm sure due to his knowledge and experience, he could be of great assistance.

Brother Clyde, could you please correct the title of this thread. It should read:

"Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide"

Thanks so much.
 

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