Kenya : Kenyan woman defends her skin bleaching

KPITRL

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The white man? I sat and TALKED to Frances Cress Welsing about her theory of Color Confrontation. :wink:

Trust, you didn't get any of what you said from either. And if you did, copy & paste. :)
She and Dick Gregory are frequent guest on the Carl Nelson show...4-7pm M-F. I wouldn't be surprised if she's on now. She said this and some. Dick Gregory just said it less than a week ago. So I can't cut and paste it. The tall, dark, and handsome thing was baby talk compared to other things that were said, like the brown basketball analogy. So why are you focusing on the tall, dark, and handsome part, when the message runs much deeper.
 

Kadijah

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She and Dick Gregory are frequent guest on the Carl Nelson show...4-7pm M-F. I wouldn't be surprised if she's on now. She said this and some. Dick Gregory just said it less than a week ago. So I can't cut and paste it. The tall, dark, and handsome thing was baby talk compared to other things that were said, like the brown basketball analogy. So why are you focusing on the tall, dark, and handsome part, when the message runs much deeper.
You're the one who introduced tall, dark, handsome AND the brown basketball analogy into the convo. :10500:
 

KPITRL

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You're the one who introduced tall, dark, handsome AND the brown basketball analogy into the convo. :10500:
That's right. And they both fall in line with what Dick Gregory and Frances Cress Welsing were saying. But you're the one suddenly believing the white man...smh.
 

Kadijah

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That's right. And they both fall in line with what Dick Gregory and Frances Cress Welsing were saying. But you're the one suddenly believing the white man...smh.
What is the wrong with you? You ask a question; I give the answer - you come back with nonsense.

And white man? You, who believe AFRICAN people should bleach their skins to what? approximate white people's lack of melanin??? You gotta be kidding! SMH
 

KPITRL

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What is the wrong with you? You ask a question; I give the answer - you come back with nonsense.

And white man? You, who believe AFRICAN people should bleach their skins to what? approximate white people's lack of melanin??? You gotta be kidding! SMH
What is the wrong with you? You ask a question; I give the answer - you come back with nonsense.

And white man? You, who believe AFRICAN people should bleach their skins to what? approximate white people's lack of melanin??? You gotta be kidding! SMH
I thought you would probably explode like you always do when you can't think of anything rational to say back, then start talking non-sense again.... bringing you closer to getting your 100th record breaking ban. You can't even disagree politely. I could explode back, but you're not worth it. So I'll just put you on ignore again because you have a serious problem. Adios :wave:
 

Kadijah

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http://nollywood.codewit.com/gossips/women-who-bleach-have-inferiority-complex-nolly-wood-actress-jennifer-eliogu-speaks-12041544

Women Who Bleach Have Inferiority Complex" Nolly Wood Actress Jennifer Eliogu Speaks
Jennifer ElioguFor Jennifer Eliogu, beauty has nothing to do with your complexion.
The Nollywood actress and singer shares her thoughts on the never ending topic – skin bleaching.
Yes you can roll your eyes, because every day, in every house, in every friend group, it is always being discussed.
In an interview with Punch, she shares that the trend may be because of insecurities.

“I cannot speak for others because it depends on the reason why they want to be light-skinned. For some people, it is because they have skin pigmentation or the skin colour is not uniform and they want to change it. I don’t know what their reasons are but I feel that for a dark-skinned person to want to tone their skin colour to be completely fair, it has to do with low self esteem.” she says.

Jennifer who recently premiered the video for her song Fantasy, continues by saying “If you are comfortable with the way you are, then you would not want to change your skin colour. If God wanted you to be fair, he would have made either of your parents fair. He would have made you come from that background but when you are not like that and you want to recreate yourself, then it has to do with self esteem. It is a different thing to want to tone up a little bit and enhance the beauty of your skin but bleaching, changing from dark to fair, I think it has to do with low self esteem. People have the impression that fair people are noticed more. For me, it is not about the colour of your skin but what you have in your head. It is about your behaviour and character.”


==========

Seems bleaching is a HOT topic on the motherland, especially in Nigeria where this Nollywood actress is from. This actress who has swallowed the propaganda of her own inferiority by referring to skin color as a virtue, i.e., "fair." All the dark-skinned women are what? UN-fair? :rolleyes:
 

KPITRL

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Many probably believe my opinion about not seeing anything wrong with a dark-skinned sister wanting to be a shade or two closer to caramel had something to do with me being light-skinned, but it didn't. Whatever a sister does to achieving that goal would be her choice, although I wouldn't recommend anything risky.

What really caused me to share my opinion earlier was when I attended our annual family picnic in the DMV last month. I had an older cousin who used to live with this female in the early 80's, and they had a son together. She was from Louisiana. I'd say she was about Esther Roles complexion. The three of them eventually moved in my apartment that I shared with my brother. They stayed with us for about a year. Although we all got on each others nerves, I became very close to them. So I knew her well enough to remember pretty much how she looked.

She came to our family picnic last month, after not seeing her since 1984, when we lost that apartment. My brother who I shared that apartment with, brought me over to her, and asked me who she was. Usually I would guess who the person is in a second, however I could not recognize who she was. So she took off her shades, and I immediately yelled out my cousins name, but not hers...I guess I was still in shock. She went from Esther Roles (Florida's) complexion to somewhere between Willona's and Penny's complexion. And it all looked natural, as though it was her normal skin-tone. She is atleast 6 years older than me, but at our family picnic, she looked as young, if not younger,, than me and my brother.

I don't know what she did to her skin, and I'm not going to sit here and lie to myself because of what people may feel about skin-lighting cream or bleaching, but she looked better than she did when I last saw her, and nowhere near her age. Maybe she got a face-lift too, I don't know. But her skin look just like somebody with glowing caramel skin who's been taking care of it. That's why I said I didn't see anything wrong with a dark-skinned sister wanting to look a shade or two lighter. I saw someone do this in real life, and I'm sure she had no complaints.
 

Kadijah

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Some men don't like dark skin on women. Fortunately, enough do that those brothers are irrelevant in their lives. However, a brother becomes detrimental when he continuously ballyhoos "caramel" skin as better, more attractive, whatever he considers to be positive, than dark skin, the majority skin type in the black community, world-wide. We all have our preferences... and there's nothing wrong with that! But when one "shoves" that preference in the faces of others, including those who do NOT fit it as more desirable, so desirable one should alter one's appearance to fit HIS preference.... to the point of destroying one's natural pigmentation while possibly endangering one's life... that's when people start talking about black self-hate.

Have your preference, but don't **** the MAJORITY of the race for not debasing themselves to meet it.

Btw, it is a truism noticed by d*arn near every black person who ever lived - black don't crack. In other words, dark-skinned people age noticeably less than lighter-skinned people. (smh)


P.S.
Btw, I'm not dark-skinned. :)
 

KPITRL

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People like to say light-skinned people age faster, but most of them when they say that, mean very light skinned close to bi-racials, which isn't even 100% true either. But in general dark-skinned people do not age less than lighter-skinned. They and other black people may age less than white people, or bi-racials in some cases, but not all the other shades of brown. It's all in the genetics when it comes to aging in black people. As I got closer to older people in real life, I saw that. But one things for sure, you're either going to grow old or die young. So I wouldn't make a blanket statement on black peoples skin complexion.

But while on this topic, you can stay in the sun a little too long. I knew someone down in Brunswick, GA. near Jekyll Island who was already dark-skinned, but stayed at the beach all summer, and every summer. She let herself get so dark, that he told me she couldn't go to work wearing all black, because when she did, people thought she was naked. That's why when you meet people who live in the hottest parts of Africa, they don't walk around half-naked like white people have you thinking. They walk around in long-sleeve shirts and long pants to protect themselves from the hot sun. This is what Africans themselves have told me. Just because you live in hot climates, it doesn't mean you supposed to look as dark as you possibly can. That is not your natural skin color, whether on purpose or by accident. Believe that, and you'll wind up with skin cancer like white people, however not as fast. As for the girl down in Jekyll Island, I hope that doesn't happen to her. I mean she would take her sun-shades off, and you could see where the sun was baking her forehead, leaving the dark-skin behind her shades looking light. She'd have to wait until fall to get her natural oils back in her skin and her normal dark-skin back. I never knew what it was with her and that sun, but it was a little dangerous if you ask me.
 
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