Kenya : Kenyan woman defends her skin bleaching

Kadijah

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Now this here I can kinda agree with, as I know a lot of blacks have a habit of doing that, including all their heritage except African...when nobody really asked them, or brought up the topic. However this sister on the bus tried to size me up into that category of blacks, and she was wrong because she brought up the topic by asking me. As dark as she was, if I had asked her the same thing, and she knew she was mixed, like most dark-skinned African-Americans really are, than the last thing she would have said was African. I'll put money on that.

You'd lose:

KPITRL said:

Another thing the sister on that bus said to me that was ridiculous came after she asked me what I was mixed with. After I named what I knew, she said "Don't forget African".
 

Kadijah

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Right. Like you she wouldn't have said Africa at all.
If she were anything like me, she would say: "I'm Black, proud of it, and all other drops of blood are irrelevant."

Course if she were like me and talking to a conscious-black person, she'd say, "I'm African" and leave it at that.

And they would understand. :)
 

KPITRL

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I once said on another site that most African-Americans were dark-skinned, and I didn't get any disagreements. Later I began to hear a few members on that site in agreement, however along with the wrong intentions using that to support their argument that it was better than the other skin-tones. As you see, unfortunately some of us here have a similar mindset, however I'm not here to discuss that non-sense.

I just wanted to say that perhaps I made an overstatement on that other sight in saying that most of us were dark-skinned. It may have been more realistic to say most of us were non-light skinned. When you have some saying Gabreill Union is dark-skinned, and some saying she is light-brown skinned (whether she bleached or not), and you have some saying Will Smith is brown skinned, and some saying he is light-skinned, then what can you say? Myself for example, I'm consider light-skinned in the South, but back in the North, although I was called light-skinned in my youth, I think most of them would just say I was non-dark skinned. I guess nobody is going to agree on this 100%. It is what it is.
 

KPITRL

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I once said on another site that most African-Americans were dark-skinned, and I didn't get any disagreements. Later I began to hear a few members on that site in agreement, however along with the wrong intentions using that to support their argument that it was better than the other skin-tones. As you see, unfortunately some of us here have a similar mindset, however I'm not here to discuss that non-sense.

I just wanted to say that perhaps I made an overstatement on that other sight in saying that most of us were dark-skinned. It may have been more realistic to say most of us were non-light skinned. When you have some saying Gabreill Union is dark-skinned, and some saying she is light-brown skinned (whether she bleached or not), and you have some saying Will Smith is brown skinned, and some saying he is light-skinned, then what can you say? Myself for example, I'm consider light-skinned in the South, but back in the North, although I was called light-skinned in my youth, I think most of them would just say I was non-dark skinned. I guess nobody is going to agree on this 100%. It is what it is.
This is why we have to be very careful and not fall for the divisive techniques laid out when it comes to this light-skinned, dark-skinned thing. The divider will whisper in one mans ear that he is closer to light-skin, then whisper in the other mans ear that he is closer to dark-skin. Then he'll run some episode like Dark Girls, or Black in America, trying to install further divide. The next thing you know, we're fighting each other, even when we have the same skin complexion or skin-tone.
 

Kadijah

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Skin is skin. Lack of melanin doesn't confer a virtue upon skin ("fair"). Nor does heavy pigmentation confer a sinful nature upon skin ("evil" black person). It's just skin. Better or worse has no place when talking about "skin." A dark-skinned person is no more "intrinsically" better than a light-skinned person, than a light-skinned person is intrinsically better than a brown-skinned person, than a brown-skinned person is intrinsically better than either of the extremes.

No better. No worse. Just skin.

As for who is light, dark, or brown-skinned? It depends on the viewer. Judge Mathis thinks he's light-skinned. When he said it on his TV show (several times - I saw the episode) a couple months ago, he got an avalanche of mail saying "HAYLE TO THE NAW! You ain't light-skinned!" Now if he's around dark-skinned people from dark-skinned families with mostly dark-skinned friends, he might look "light." But to most people, he looks brown-skinned. (I can't believe I'm actually being this elementary :10500: ).

Although skin is only skin, many DO place virtues on skin tone, e.g., "fair." As "fair" is a GOOD virtue, it's opposite "dark" is not. People not on the "not good" side have to work harder for acceptance in society, to be thought of as a virtuous person, oft-times even a desirable mate. It is not the hue of one's skin that is good or bad, rather it is the attitude and bias of the person judging them that causes for possible conflict and angst in the whateva-color person's life. Thus, we get films like Dark Girls. Not divisive, rather seeking to bridge the divide between who the dark-skinned are and how they are perceived by, mainly, black society.
 

Dreya

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i agree with what Kadijah said on this - skins just skin - if i stand next to my dad people would say i was light skinned - if i stand next to my cousins people would say i was dark skinned - so like its all relative right and so in the mind of the person looking to - but i have to add just like an exclamation of like WTH! bleaching your skin??!! what on earth is that going to do to you lonterm - i mean what are you risking - premture aging maybe or skin cancer even or something - all to look a lil bit lighter - thats just plain cuckoo crazy if you ask me
 

KPITRL

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i agree with what Kadijah said on this - skins just skin - if i stand next to my dad people would say i was light skinned - if i stand next to my cousins people would say i was dark skinned - so like its all relative right and so in the mind of the person looking to - but i have to add just like an exclamation of like WTH! bleaching your skin??!! what on earth is that going to do to you lonterm - i mean what are you risking - premture aging maybe or skin cancer even or something - all to look a lil bit lighter - thats just plain cuckoo crazy if you ask me
http://www.blackskinlightening.com/dangerous-skin-bleaching-vs-safe-skin-lightening/

I read there was a difference between skin bleaching and skin lighting cream, as bleaching is much more dangerous. I don't think anybody here is for skin bleaching, although some may try to put words in your mouth and say you are. I heard that there are many safe skin-lighting cream procedures that aren't even discussed, as mentioned in this article. I mentioned in this thread that I know someone personally whose skin went from Florida Evans' (Good Times) complexion to Willonas, and it looked good on her. I'm sure she didn't bleach. I think she used skin-lighting cream. Or perhaps, after not seeing her for 30 years, she may have naturally changed to that complexion. She was from Louisiana. She may have even had a face lift. Of course I didn't ask her all that. I just know she was a least 5 years older than me, but looked younger than me, and I thought I looked young for my age...I think people just like to tell us that. Anyway, what brought me in this thread was when I heard someone criticize a black woman for wanting to be lighter, which doesn't mean looking light-skinned. I thought about this woman who I hadn't seen in 30 years, who was really my deceased cousins ex-girlfriend that he had a son with, who is now 33. I was kinda speaking in her defense, especially since her skin didn't peel off like an orange.


But on the other hand, I knew a girl that I worked with and dated who was even darker, and I can tell just by looking at her that she would not have looked better going anywhere near Willonas' complexion...she would have looked worst. I guess lighter skin compliments some, while others it could do the opposite.

I too agree that skin is just skin. I just don't like when people contradict themselves. Although you can probably hold your own, don't let the bullies intimidate you.
 

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