IS IT TIME TO GO TO WAR AGAINST THE RAP INDUSTRY?

Destee

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emanuel goodman said:
I belive that rap is a new generation that was hatched from hip hop. I prefer to look at rap as hip hop's messed up and confused illegitamate son. Rap music is mostly centered around the obtainment of goods by means that was taught by the replacement teachers the amercian white male who demonstrated to us quite well how wealth and power can be obtained Through derespecting ,raping ,stealing, and killing for whatever we want. We also learned that all disputes can only be settle by a show of force.However it is possible that our gangsta rap brothers are unaware of the damage they are causing and i belive that any seperation on our parts in not in our best interests at this time . By communicating and healing our brothers and sisters we can use them as a vechile to reach our uninformed brothers and sisters to our level of understanding. We must educate not seperate.
Yes Brother Emanuel Goodman ... i so agree ... we must educate not separate.

I am so with you on that ... :bowdown: :bowdown: :bowdown:

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Sefirot

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I just watched a lecture by The Irritated Genie. He broke down and showed clips from the "farms" during slavery. He spoke on how the fite wolk horded our women in farms and would have a black sell-out dressed really nicely to lead the crackas over to fondle them. The women would be scantily dressed gyrating exposing themselves.

Then he showed these heinous music videos that are marketed to us. The Black Man is no longer the protector of Black Women. He is the pimp who displays them as sexual objects instead of helping them build their true spiritual nature. Then he showed the 12-18 year old girls that they would aggressively force themselves on. And again, that bum of a b.a.n would be smiling selling them away. Then he showed the farm with the little boys and the grown men. That same ***** would be grabbing on the men for these devils. Nothing has changed. Rather, it's only reverting back to how it was.

Then the Brother showed how those little boys who were molested would grow up as aggressive savages from being assaulted so frequently. It would be these boys who would grow to be the men selected to "breed" with the women forced to copulate.

We would sell out our own women and children for money. I say this goes much deeper than rap, but it sure is a great place to start. It’s the same music video over and over with the different punks playing pimps and playas. I really need to be "shaken" like this from time to time. But how lost we are truly gets me down sometimes..
 

Omowale Jabali

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jamesfrmphilly said:
no, i said that they did not sound pro black to me. maybe they sound like that to you. i just don't feel it. am i permitted to not feel it?


i do not follow any of these people closely. i hear what comes across my airwaves and i base my opinion on that.
none of them produce anything that would inspire me to look any closer.



is that wrong? i loved the sixties. are you trying to say that i have not learned anything at all in the past 40 years? wow.


actually, that is the way i feel about you. here you seem to be finding all kinds of fault with my person because i do not share your taste in hip hop.
can we get any more shallow than that?

looking back this was virtually a DEAD THREAD which I decided to post in and YOu have been on ME ever since now you trynna get personal, again, then act as if you are somehow being "victimized"


how much more shallow are you gonna get??
 

jamesfrmphilly

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omowalejabali said:
looking back this was virtually a DEAD THREAD which I decided to post in and YOu have been on ME ever since now you trynna get personal, again, then act as if you are somehow being "victimized"


how much more shallow are you gonna get??
OK, you win. i am wrong and you are right. i surrender.
 

conflict

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Great point I truly believe we have to look within our own families and start taking responsibility for the problems in the black community
 

FLATFOOTFLOOGIE

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jamesfrmphilly said:
easy, they are not doing nothing that sounds pro black to me. if they were, in fact, pro black they would not be on the white man's airwaves.
i'm sorry, i just do not feel it. wake me up when they get to the last poets level.

btw - i remind you once again that there does not have to be something wrong with everyone who has a different opinion from yours.
James, please help me understand this statement.

easy, they are not doing nothing that sounds pro black to me. if they were, in fact, pro black they would not be on the white man's airwaves.
.
Like Miles and Coltrane weren't on the White Man's airwaves?

Jill Scott is one of those sisters who, through her poetry, you must listen to a bit more closely, as she is uplifting of Black Folks, much as the ROOTS are. The same can be said of a number of young artists in the whole HipHop genre. As Brother Omowale said, there is a lack of balance, as in let's never throw the baby out with the bath water. The fact that we cannot see anything of positive and redeeming value in HipHop has more to do with our choice to see it as entirely negative. This may have something to do with feeling a particular musical genre or artform has passed us by, or has little intrinsic value.

Of course, HipHop has plenty of intrinsic value - if as brother Omowale is saying, we have the participation of jazz musicians. But, as you know, brother Omowale, these brothers and sisters you mentioned, and some I mentioned, have not been fully participating in the genre for a long time. There was a beautiful trend in the early to mid -1990's, when rap artists liberally turned to Jazz as a source of inspiration, and magically drew in what we thought would be a new era. Sadly, that did not happen, and the genre - in my opinion - has regressed because of it. It is seeminlgly 95% bling and gangsta/wangsta wannbe commercialism, and only a rare few are true to delivering a redeeming message. Money and being a star, is the over-riding concern of the vast majority of these so-called artists, and there-in lies the problem. The whole issue of whether the genre has great redeeming value in and of itself, is unquestionable, but in its present manifestation, with all the emphasis on money and not art and culture, there is an ugly imbalance in the artform. That is where I agree with James - that it is nihilistic and detrimental to the minds of our youth at present.
 

jamesfrmphilly

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FLATFOOTFLOOGIE said:
James, please help me understand this statement.
they are not doing nothing that sounds pro black to me. if they were, in fact, pro black they would not be on the white man's airwaves.
.
i said they did not sound pro black to me. i repeat, they do not sound pro black to me.
they may sound like that to you, you ain't me, i ain't you. capish?

living in philly i have heard Jill Scott. i may have heard her before you heard her, singing at street parties and such. i don't care for her. i certainly never heard anything pro black from her. every time i see the roots they be collaborating with some white boys or making movies about getting with some jew girls.
i'm sorry, none of that is pro black to me. i repeat, to me.

i'll stick with my last poets, my PE and my dead prez, thank U.
 

Joyce

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omowalejabali said:

You said:
I dont ignore the negative aspects of RAP/hip hop but I believe there seems to be a lack of balance concerning how its viewed by the OLDER generation and folks like Oprah dont help. Neither do the arguments of OLDER black people who sound like Oprah, who, by the way, has a target audience of 50+ WHITE WOMEN, for the most part.


I hope you know that RAP has a larger audience of white folks than Oprah by at least 10x plus the world. Asians, hispanics, etc. As many of them put it...they love listening to "negga" music. I hope you know that white people are the biggest purchasers of RAP music and it is not viewed by them as something positive but simply entertaining. We need to lay down this slavery mindset of black people entertaining the white man with his desparity.

You Also Said:

So my problem is when older folks who are not part of this community or art form blankedly condemn it and the people involved while not knowing just how deeply rooted segments of the hip hop community are embedded not only in jazz but the Black arts movement.


I guess I would be considered old (even though I don't feel like it) but believe it or not I love this art form. However, I am very selective at what and who I listen to. Just don't like putting poison on my brain. If your lyrics is made up of profanity and porn expressions and guns, that to me is not art because anybody can do that and thus you won't hold my attention. But if you are a Lauren Hill or Felica Jones...then you got my attention. I am a poet...how could I not love the art form of Hip Hop.
 

That Jones Boy

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While I support the general idea of this thread I do have a point or question.
It has too be brought up that if there wern`t so many black females willing too appear in these videos the explotation couldn`t exist.
Now it has to be argued that isn`t part of and maybe even the core of this problem down to the amount of black women willing to appear in these videos.
so sure brothers doing the exploiting need re educating but can`t it be argued that the real solution is educating and changing the thinking and awareness levels of the women willing to appear in these videos.
once these ilk of black women (those lacking awarness of their own worth) are no longer willing to degrade themselves in these videos then the problem is solved ?
The brothers doing the exploiting will hopefully get wised up by this turn of events and the "devils" wants and needs will no longer matter anyway?
 

Omowale Jabali

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FLATFOOTFLOOGIE said:
James, please help me understand this statement.



Like Miles and Coltrane weren't on the White Man's airwaves?

Jill Scott is one of those sisters who, through her poetry, you must listen to a bit more closely, as she is uplifting of Black Folks, much as the ROOTS are. The same can be said of a number of young artists in the whole HipHop genre. As Brother Omowale said, there is a lack of balance, as in let's never throw the baby out with the bath water. The fact that we cannot see anything of positive and redeeming value in HipHop has more to do with our choice to see it as entirely negative. This may have something to do with feeling a particular musical genre or artform has passed us by, or has little intrinsic value.

Of course, HipHop has plenty of intrinsic value - if as brother Omowale is saying, we have the participation of jazz musicians. But, as you know, brother Omowale, these brothers and sisters you mentioned, and some I mentioned, have not been fully participating in the genre for a long time. There was a beautiful trend in the early to mid -1990's, when rap artists liberally turned to Jazz as a source of inspiration, and magically drew in what we thought would be a new era. Sadly, that did not happen, and the genre - in my opinion - has regressed because of it. It is seeminlgly 95% bling and gangsta/wangsta wannbe commercialism, and only a rare few are true to delivering a redeeming message. Money and being a star, is the over-riding concern of the vast majority of these so-called artists, and there-in lies the problem. The whole issue of whether the genre has great redeeming value in and of itself, is unquestionable, but in its present manifestation, with all the emphasis on money and not art and culture, there is an ugly imbalance in the artform. That is where I agree with James - that it is nihilistic and detrimental to the minds of our youth at present.

Again, I AGREE that "hip hop" has, to a large extent, become negative particularly in the way WOMEN (of all races) are objectified and that there is an overabundance of negative messages which are straight up detrimental to our communities. However, my problem is with considering an Artform as "anti-Black" when emphasis is on the bet/mtv/vh1 corporate media projections while hip hop is, again, a CULTURE which has both positive and negative elements.

I spend most of my time networking on other websites including my own networking with hip hop and jazz musicans and promoters. A number of which collaborate with each other and there is a hard-core element in los angeles that does not get media play because of snoop, dre and the game but this group is deeply rooted in the black arts movement so it's my LIFE to at least counteract "propaganda" which does not recognize this community exists.

Furthermore, I am from a family which itself has been very instrumental in post genres...namely Don Cherry and his daughter Neneh. When Don passed in 95 some of his children were working on a project with the Watts Prophets and Horace Tapscott used to perform with hip hop MUSICIANS in los angeles...Project Blowed artists regularly interacted with jazz musicians at the World Stage and played chess with each other and hung out at 5th St ***** and Richard Fulton was also instrumental in bringing these communities together. What is amazing to me is how as I myself became more active in the club scene between 1995 to 1998 there were so many key figures who died during this time....Don Cherry....Tupac Shakur...Horace Tapscott...Notorious BIG...Eddie Harris...Billy Higgins...and pianist Nate Morgan who ran the Mingus Workshop fell ill....Khalid Muhammad who was from LA passed....along with Richard Fulton and Juno Lewis...and a few more that escape my memory right now...so when you speak of what DID NOT happen, that is a matter of location because in los angeles it did.....but the elder jazz musician (oh yeah...drummer Roy Porter also) passed on...while some of their mentors did move forward but they are not getting airtime....or...their groups broke up for lack of support...for example...Roy Hargrove and Nicholas Payton (see Hargrove's RH Factor) both moved forward but groups such as B Sharp Quartet and Blacknote did not...these all had roots within the hip hop community..same with local poet Kamau Daood and then Saul Williams used to come through as well...the more I dig into this the more I can come up with....such as Roy Ayer's group Ubiquity...there are more....and I think that its long overdue that these positive folks be supported rather than writing off an entire community/artform as "anti-Black" when there are hip hop RAPTAVISTS that are the most pro-Black folks alive in amerikkka.....Dead Prez...A-Alikes....Poetree...P.O.C.C....Dedan...FTP Movement...BAOC....Abstract Tibe Unique....Omar Maxim...Mayan Eye....Hieroglyphics....Guerilla Funk Recordings....Maya Jupiter....N.A.T......countless others...
 

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