IS IT TIME TO GO TO WAR AGAINST THE RAP INDUSTRY?

Ralfa'il

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Sun Ship

Brother jamesfrmphilly I like your post. Black folks just don’t understand the metaphysical power of music…we have forgotten about the sacredness of music and it’s true intention. We couldn’t even worship our ancestral African deities without the drum (that’s one of many reason they took our drums during slavery)…But, now sacred rhythms have become known as just the “beat” and are played through digital hardware and software. We have no knowledge of the importance of overtones, resonance, timbre and other acoustic nuances that are lost, not only through the digital creation of sounds, but also though the digital recording of natural sounds (as in the CD format)
Our people don't know it but our enemy certainly does.

The beat/rhythm is actually a catalyst for the lyrics/message to reach the soul/mind of the listener.

In Islam, children are often taught how to memorize the entier Koran through rhythm and poetic prose.
The same in ancient Indian and Hebrew societies.

These devils found out that if they put violent and immoral lyrics to a powerful hypnotic beat, they can burn these values into the minds of our youth and control them.

This is why they can memorize an entire rap album after listening to it only 2 times, but can't even read the constitution.


It's all about frequencies and wave-lengths.

Because black people (especially AfroAmericans) have more fast-twitching muscle fibers we have more muscular control and can make sharper more complex music because of our natural precision.

It's the same with dancing.

Our greater muscular precision allows us greater control over our bodies to dance and move, spin around, stop on a dime, do things others just can't do.

No one can break-dance like a black man.....why did it have to go out of style.
 

Jasel

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I'm not a big fan of the rap industry in general. BET and such seemed to actually have moral values during the 80's and early 90's but they seem to have diminished almost to the point of being non-existant. I really don't like the idea of black people looking up and respecting people like 50 cent, Ice cube and such and idolizing their lifestyle. There are alot of blacks who listen to rap almost exclusively. I know there are whites who listen to rap of course but alot of them will branch out into country, rock, techno, metal, etc. You have to keep in mind that popular music today is as effective as the media. I recognize that there are decent rappers out there who try to send out positive messages but compared to the majority there aren't that many. I know if i turned on BET right now I'd probably see a guy rappin about sex, money, or drugs and dressed like a thug with black women dancing around him half naked. Once alot of these rappers make it they really don't seem to care what type of message they send out as long as they get paid. Of course money changes alot of people and i know blacks aren't the only exception, but i think this is getting out of hand. It seems like there's a new rapper breaking into the scene every week.
 

Ralfa'il

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Mar 25, 2005
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Jasel

I'm not a big fan of the rap industry in general. BET and such seemed to actually have moral values during the 80's and early 90's but they seem to have diminished almost to the point of being non-existant. I really don't like the idea of black people looking up and respecting people like 50 cent, Ice cube and such and idolizing their lifestyle. There are alot of blacks who listen to rap almost exclusively. I know there are whites who listen to rap of course but alot of them will branch out into country, rock, techno, metal, etc. You have to keep in mind that popular music today is as effective as the media. I recognize that there are decent rappers out there who try to send out positive messages but compared to the majority there aren't that many. I know if i turned on BET right now I'd probably see a guy rappin about sex, money, or drugs and dressed like a thug with black women dancing around him half naked. Once alot of these rappers make it they really don't seem to care what type of message they send out as long as they get paid. Of course money changes alot of people and i know blacks aren't the only exception, but i think this is getting out of hand. It seems like there's a new rapper breaking into the scene every week.
These rappers are nothing more than circus clowns paid to perform and put on a show for thier mostly white audience.

Modern day UncleToms and Step-N-Fetch-It's.

White people want to believe that black men are immoral, lazy, ignorant, and dangerous and so they want to listen to as much music and watch as many movies as they possibly can to confirm these beliefs.

The more a rapper exhibits these negative images and confirms what white men have been telling the world about us...the more he's paid and the more publicity he gets.


Just like in WWI and WWII when they used to pay some black fool to strap a fake tail to his butt and run around naked after midnight to confirm the myth that black men grow tales and rape white women at night.
 

Froggy1

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Mar 22, 2005
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Ralfa'il said:
Jasel


These rappers are nothing more than circus clowns paid to perform and put on a show for thier mostly white audience.

Modern day UncleToms and Step-N-Fetch-It's.

White people want to believe that black men are immoral, lazy, ignorant, and dangerous and so they want to listen to as much music and watch as many movies as they possibly can to confirm these beliefs.

The more a rapper exhibits these negative images and confirms what white men have been telling the world about us...the more he's paid and the more publicity he gets.


Just like in WWI and WWII when they used to pay some black fool to strap a fake tail to his butt and run around naked after midnight to confirm the myth that black men grow tales and rape white women at night.
They did that in world war two? That isht is degrading!
 

Ralfa'il

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Froggy

They did that in world war two? That isht is degrading!
Ofcourse, they did it in WWI also.

If you can find any, talk to some of the old veterans who were around back then and they'll tell you that their biggest enemies were often their fellow white American soldiers who were overthere spreading lies about them.
 

oceolo

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Society has no morals so why would you expect the rap industry to have any?
 

Omowale Jabali

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Sun Ship said:

Brother jamesfrmphilly
I like your post. Black folks just don’t understand the metaphysical power of music…we have forgotten about the sacredness of music and it’s true intention. We couldn’t even worship our ancestral African deities without the drum (that’s one of many reason they took our drums during slavery)…But, now sacred rhythms have become known as just the “beat” and are played through digital hardware and software. We have no knowledge of the importance of overtones, resonance, timbre and other acoustic nuances that are lost, not only through the digital creation of sounds, but also though the digital recording of natural sounds (as in the CD format)


We think that “Manchurian candidate” type brainwashing is something that happens on some government-sponsored deep conspiratorial level, but it is happening everyday to our youth.

We may not be able to always keep our children from listening to the most acidic forms of rap music, but we can control what goes on in our house. Believe me, there is a direct correlation between our Black young adults de-spiritualization and delinquent behavior, and music. But, I’m not going to say just this generation, but this has been a slippery slope in our community for years. There is an unfortunate disconnect with the intrinsic value of our music and culture among older African Americans also…even some of those, who feel they are culturally centered. Some of our most progressive music, visual art and written word has been around for years and still hasn’t made it into the natural environment of the average Black home. It’s interesting that Jazz is viewed all over the world, as one of the highest artistic cultural creations of almost any people in modern times and has been rarely recognized or honored in our community

Our children cannot be sacred to us if we allow them to listen to the profane.
The irony here is that there is a segment of the "rap" community that has embraced "jazz" and actually built upon its foundation.

Witness for example Herbie Hancock's "Rockit" which is considered one of hip hop's earliest video hits. Also, Miles Davis' collaboration with Easy Moe B. Same with Guru's "Jazmatazz" and some recordings by Ornette Coleman and his son Denardo, such as "Tone Dialing". The same also applies to numerous recordings by Neneh Cherry, Greg Osby, Courtney Pine and Roy Hargrove as well as Brandford Marsalis' "Buckshot LaFunk". The Roots are a hip hop band which has backed several artisists in live performance such as Mos Def, Jill Scott, Common and Erykah Badu who are known to go into jazz improvisational lyrics during live performance and I have personally heard Mos Def do material ala Leon Thomas.

The problem I have with these types of discussion threads is writing off an entire musical genre in favor of "jazz" and other musical forms which had its own drug addicts, alcaholics, pimps, players and hustlers during their day as well. In fact, many "be-bop" musicians had untimely early deaths due to being killed (Lee Morgan, Albert Ayler) or drug abuse (Trane, Bird). Miles' band at one time was paid in "smack".

Hip hop is today's "be-bop". If folks want to go to "war" against it it will be tantamount to going to war against black "youth culture".

Black youth who are little influenced by Essence, Oprah and the NAACP...
 

Kemetstry

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bigtown said:
What do you think about this guys? Essence magazine has launched a campaign to end the negative images of black women portrayed in rap videos and rap music. I support Essence 110 percent. This in my opinion, should have been started by the NAACP, but we all know how useless they've become. My question is, where are the black men in this fight. Why do the black men allow the image of our women to be trashed all over the world just because lil (no talent) Jon has a good beat on that track? Or is it because rappers are black men we have some kind of warped loyalty to them? If rock music started having "step n fetchit" or "Amos and Andy" type characters in it's videos would we stand for that? Brothers, don't you think it's time we had the sisters backs on this? Rap is being manipulated by devils and they're using black men ( rappers ) most of which are misguided idiots who could care less about the black race let alone black women, and turning them into whores on a global stage. It's real brothers, is it time to go to war with our sisters on this?

Actually, it was time over 10 years ago. These fools have now defined blackness as ignorance and stupidity. The mysoginy is secondary by comparision

 

jamesfrmphilly

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omowalejabali said:
Hip hop is today's "be-bop". If folks want to go to "war" against it it will be tantamount to going to war against black "youth culture".
i disagree. the skill levels are no where near comparable.
if youth culture is wrong and anti black it does need to be challenged.
 

Omowale Jabali

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jamesfrmphilly said:
i disagree. the skill levels are no where near comparable.
if youth culture is wrong and anti black it does need to be challenged.

i dont really expect you to agree but as a musician i will continue to take exception to your viewpoint.

you continue to generalize against a culture while not recognizing the positive aspects within what is an international phenomenon that has a myriad of positive artists and i am sure that you are simply out of touch and living in a by-gone era.
 

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