Black Positive People : Introducing Barbados: The First Developed Black Country

WhatNeedsToBeDone

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Maybe you have no life where you have to post between a laptop and a computer to prove a point to random strangers who you will never ever meet or even come across in your life; but not me.

lol, everything that I post is backed up by sources and available upon request. If reality hits a nerve and you can't deal with the truth then that's a personal issue that you must overcome. Just know that denial is very counterproductive.
 

Kadijah

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Speaking negatively of black people?

PLEASE show ONE post where I have spoken negatively of a black person? I beg of you.
Go look at your alerts. I believe I posted to them. :)

Oh, btw, Mr. "euuu, looka here! A "developed" black nation":

Report: Women in corporate Africa rise to top while G7 economies' females come in at dead last


The Grant Thornton International Business Report (IBR) for 2013 indicates that Botswana has the highest number of women filling senior management positions notably in the financial services sector.

Despite the country taking a slight dip in the number of women in those management positions from 39 percent in 2012 to 32 percent, it still surpasses both South Africa, which remained at 28 percent and the rest of the world at 24 percent.

“Batswana women were found to rise to the top as Corporate / Financial Controller (26 percent) followed closely by General or Office Manager (25 percent) and then HR Director (14 percent). South African businesses had a higher number of female CFOs (32 percent), followed by female HR Directors (27 percent) and then female Sales Directors (15 percent). “This indicates more doors opening in the financial sector, traditionally a male-dominated sector,” reads the report.

However, South African businesses showed a higher number of female Chief Financial Officers (CFO) at 32 percent, followed by female HR Directors at 27 percent and then female Sales Directors at 15 percent. According to the IBR, globally, more women are making it into senior management roles than at any time since 2010. On the debit side, however, progress was said to be slower in the G7 group of developed economies, where economic performances have been stuttering, than in the high growth economies of Asia and the Far East.

The IBR urged businesses in developed economies to emulate emerging market counterparts and reap the benefits of having more women in senior positions. The IBR data also showed that globally, women are now filling 24 percent of senior management roles, a rise from 21 percent in 2012 and 20 percent in 2011 respectively.






http://www.mmegi.bw/index.php?sid=4&aid=1685&dir=2013/March/Monday11
 

WhatNeedsToBeDone

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Go look at your alerts. I believe I posted to them. :)

Oh, btw, Mr. "euuu, looka here! A "developed" black nation":

Well, you know what...

I just thought it would be interesting knowledge to share with others who may not be aware of an actual legitimately proven and undisputable successful black nation. Since there is significant ignorance surrounding the whole topic.

If you've been on many other forums, they are loaded with both racists and downright ignorant people claiming/asking:
- "Why are blacks the only race who can't develop a nation?"
- "Why are ppl letting blacks run the US when they can't even run their own nations?"
- "When will black get their act together and run at least one nation right like the east asians?"

Yes, of course there have been respectable black empires in the past; but it's nice to actually have undeniable and undebatable proof on paper of a black success story to put some of these 'blacks are inferior' notions to rest. It's unfortunate that you can't be happy for their success
 

Kadijah

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Maybe you have no life where you have to post between a laptop and a computer to prove a point to random strangers who you will never ever meet or even come across in your life; but not me.
:rofl:

lol, everything that I post is backed up by sources and available upon request. If reality hits a nerve and you can't deal with the truth then that's a personal issue that you must overcome. Just know that denial is very counterproductive.
Me, too. As in:

Rwanda (Africa) ranked MORE politically stable than China and India by the World Bank

In its modern evolutionary history the tiny sovereign state of Rwanda in Africa was known initially as a country of a thousand hills, becoming a country of a thousand problems, while today this densely-populated state in the heart of Africa is more and more wearing the description of a country of a thousand opportunities. Rwanda's renewal is most evident in the 'buzz' of entrepreneurs flooding into Kigali, of foreign corporations jostling for a slice of what some are calling an 'economic miracle'. 'It's amazing how in eighties our experts saw passion fruit as the only potential driver of the economy of Rwanda', a former IMF official remarked as we drove to Gisenyi on the picturesque Lake Kivu, whereas today we are experiencing an economic awakening of truly astonishing diversity.

In the past ten years Rwanda has astounded many of its harshest critics by creating a model of peace and stability in one of the most war-torn regions. In parallel with national reconciliation, Rwanda has transformed its economic fortunes and now punches far above its weight diplomatically, both within the continent and globally. Not all critics' charges can be easily dismissed. Rwanda's media, for instance, is not nearly free as it ought to be; this could be justified by the continued fear of the negative role played by media during genocide.

Nevertheless, Rwanda's achievements are nothing short of remarkable considering its recent upheaval:

- World's fastest global reformer ( World Bank 'Doing business report' 2010)

- Top country in sub-Sahara Africa on the World Economic Forum's competitive index( 2011);and

- Least corrupt country in Africa after Botswana, Cape Verde, and Mauritius according to Transparency International ( 2011)

This is an astonishing achievement for a country which has only recently in an historical context emerged from the horrors of genocide on an industrial scale. How could this have been possible? How could a tiny country which had been on its knees so recently, now be ranked higher than China and India on the World Bank governance indicator of political stability?

I recall a conversation we had with Nobel laureate Oscar Arias Sanchez, who served two separate terms as President of Costa Rica. I asked him to what he attributed his success as president, and he replied in a soft but confident voice: "Leadership is about choice and the willingness to fight for what you believe in, without compromise". That statement still resonates profoundly with me as I observe the volatile political landscape of Africa on a daily basis.

No leader has been more decisive in the history of an African country than Paul Kagame, indeed for all the naysayers' criticisms of his style of his leadership of a hardnosed leader who brooks no nonsense, a man hard to himself as anyone around him.Can anyone seriously imagine what this country might look like were it not for his unflinching commitment to its political survival and recovery? Known as 'President and CEO' , Kagame has boldly steered Rwanda away from the scourges of corruption and cronyism which have become rooted in the fabric of all too many African countries, among them many new 'democracies'. Often forgotten is the fact that he inherited in 1994 not just a genocide-ravaged society but also a desperately poor country, with 90 percent of the population engaged in subsistence farming. He wisely called on a host of international experts and advisors to address the country's manifold economic challenges with the aim of transforming Rwanda in just few decades into a middle income country, shifting from agriculture to a knowledge-based society.

The results speak for themselves. Rwanda's GDP has grown on average 7% annually since 1994. Inflation has been curbed, exports taxes abolished, trade liberalized. Its new constitution protects free repatriation of capital and profits. Public entities have been restructured and privatized, while the central bank is independent and assertive.

=========
- a $4 billion railway linking the Dar Es Salaam port to Rwanda-Burundi-via Congo to the Southern African cape gauge railway network;

- a $300 million phase-one new airport at Bugesera, 40 km from Kigali;

- a concession of 55 billion cubic meters of methane gas to generate electricity and conversion of gas to liquid.

Coffee is Rwanda's primary foreign exchange earner, but that is set to change on the back of advanced explorations and developments in the mining sector, especially gold, tin and tungsten.

For all Rwanda's impressive economic gains, they pale beside the remarkable reconciliation forged in the genocide's aftermath, primarily between Hutu and Tutsi 'De-ethnicising' a country that so recently succumbed to systematic ethnic killing on a scale comparable to the holocaust was always going to be a formidable challenge, but no one could have predicted how quickly the desire for a common Rwandese identity could be rekindled in the minds of the population. Much of the credit must go to the countless ordinary Rwandans who have participated in the gacaca courts - the traditional Rwandan system of community justice.

Over a decade ago Rwanda was a poster-boy for the 'hopeless continent'. Yet just as that phrase has now been repudiated by the august publication that coined it, Rwanda has also defied all predictions of economic and social catastrophe to emerge as an inspiring model - and perhaps not only for Africa.




http://allafrica.com/stories/201202010428.html
 

WhatNeedsToBeDone

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It appears as if you are taking this nation's success as an attack on Africa?

I'm very aware of good news coming from Africa. Heck, here is chart straight from "The Economist" showing some African nations growing at some of the fastest rates in the world:

http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/01/daily_chart

The thread subject is about *HUMAN DEVELOPMENT* and the quality of life of general populations. A country's economy could be as large as it wants to be but if the quality of life for most citizens is still low then it's all in vein (though i'm not undermining the important of a strong economy). Look at India, they are an economic powerhouse but most citizens live in absolute squalid conditions.
 

Kadijah

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It appears as if you are taking this nation's success as an attack on Africa?
Only a non-black person would think that.

I'm very aware of good news coming from Africa. Heck, here is chart straight from "The Economist" showing some African nations growing at some of the fastest rates in the world:

http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/01/daily_chart
With links to the economic and social development of various African countries at my fingertips, do you seriously think I'm not aware of the above? (lol)

The thread subject is about *HUMAN DEVELOPMENT* and the quality of life of general populations. A country's economy could be as large as it wants to be but if the quality of life for most citizens is still low then it's all in vein (though i'm not undermining the important of a strong economy). Look at India, they are an economic powerhouse but most citizens live in absolute squalid conditions.
This is your concluding statement of the OP:

Yes, it's a small country but Barbados does really prove a lot. It shows that a black nation can succeed under black rule and shatters the failed ideology that blacks are inferior.
Why would you ASSume that black people think we're inferior? So inferior we need stats on a nation of less than 1 million people and lauding it as the ONLY developed Black Nation.... to what? make us feel better?

Fat and fine, thank you very much! :)
 

Kadijah

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dunwiddat

Please, do not be swayed by this person to believe I have anything other than love and the greatest respect for you and your country.

I was offended at his patronization of you, I, and all black people everywhere with his head-patting "euuu, a developed black nation!" post. To set the record straight was my only reason for replying. Again, you know I love you, and as it was Barbados which opened its arms to my fav, the Black Seminoles escaping America and slavery, I have nothing but love and respect for your country and its accomplishments, as well. :heart:
 

Destee

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According to the U.N.'s Human Development Index, the independent Caribbean nation of Barbados has reached the highest category of the index. It is now in the "very high human development" and classed as a developed nation. Barbados is now the most developed nation in the western hemisphere outside of the United States and Canada; and the most developed nation in the Caribbean/Latin America:
http://hdr.undp.org/en/statistics/
(Also note that The Bahamas is also another predominately black nation extremely close to being classified as a developed nation)

Here are some facts about Barbados:
Population: 289,000
Ethnic makeup: 93% black, 3% white, 3% multiracial, 1% South Asian
Life Expectancy: 75 years old
Literacy Rate: 99.7%
Official Language: English
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/bb.html

Yes, it's a small country but Barbados does really prove a lot. It shows that a black nation can succeed under black rule and shatters the failed ideology that blacks are inferior.

So what do you guys think that other similar countries can learn from Barbados?

This winter, I will be visiting Barbados on my way to Trinidad and can't wait!!

:hello: WhatNeedsToBeDone ... Welcome Welcome Welcome ... :wave:

Thanks for joining us and sharing!

We have a relatively new "Countries Category" and i'm thinking we should now add Barbados!!! :)

Such a beautiful introduction, and maybe you can tell us more about it as well!

Is that your home? So nice to have you with us! Makes me think of Sister dunwiddat, including her country!

Again ... thanks for joining us and please make yourself at home!

Much Love and Peace.

:heart:

Destee
 

Angela22

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what does 'developed' mean?

From my point of view, it seems as if he's stating that while there were "black civilizations" of old, that in no way meant they were "developed", and that we have no proof to say they were.

However, if he actually knew what "civilization" meant, then maybe he'd see that my stating these societies existed meant that I was taking them being "developed" as an already given thing.

One meaning of "civilization" from dictionary dot com:

1.
an advanced state of human society, in which a high level of culture, science, industry, and government has been reached.


Noticed the underlined words.

And here's a meaning of "developed":

to bring out the capabilities or possibilities of; bring to a more advanced or effective state:


Again, notice the underlined.

Now, if one can put two and two together, they'd see a black civilization is indeed a developed country, seeing that both required advancement to be called so. I didn't just say, "society", or "community", which may or may not be advanced, but civilization, as did WhatNeedsToBeDone, when challenging my point.

So, please WhatNeedsToBeDone, before questioning another's knowledge, make sure your own is in check on the same subject, K? Because right now, you're contradicting yourself.

All in good discussion. :)
 

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