Nigeria : In pictures: Nigerian Igbo wedding

panafrica

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Aug 24, 2002
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The Diaspora
jamesfrmphilly said:
i was gonna ask how all dem African women got all dat straight hair........
Again without knowing the women in question, I would assume them African sisters have perms in their hair (just like our own African American sisters do) or that they might be wearing wigs. Despite popular opinion there are a number of African women who do both of these things, just like many AA woman.

Now back to Igbo wedding traditions….I would like to know how the ceremony is performed?
 

kemetkind

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Oct 8, 2005
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panafrica said:
Kemetkind:

I believe the primary reason for your confusion is that you’re being presumptuous. You are both over analyzing the pictures of this article and making assumptions without knowing the facts. Your first assumption is that I included the bride in the statement that “black women are beautiful”, and that I was referencing this article specifically when I co-signed brother Militant’s statement; instead of my agreeing with the statement in general. The second assumption that you are making is about this woman’s heritage, without knowing exactly what it is (neither one of us does). The bride could be a light skinned black person, they do exist you know (I happen to be one of them). One thing which too many people don’t seem to realize is that skin tone differences are natural within the black race. I know many continental Africans from Kenya and Nigeria (Igbo) that are light brown skinned with absolutely no racial mixture. Just because a black person isn’t as dark as Manute Bol or Alec Wek doesn’t automatically mean they have mixed blood. This being said, the bride could actually be a mulatto (which also exist in Africa) just like the two mulattos you are comparing her to. That being the case, it would render the point you are trying to make moot! Again without knowing I can not say, and neither can you.

There are two major factors that makes the couple in the “black and white twin” article not black but biracial. One is their direct lineage, and the second is their self identification. Their appearance is not the most important consideration. Their heritage is the most important consideration and that heritage will determine their self identification. That being the case: It isn’t what “I” (PanAfrica) consider them to be, but what they consider themselves to be. Indeed what they consider themselves to be, and how that consideration is manifested in their social-behavior (dating, marriage, and mating). The two individuals who became parents of those black and white twins are biracial. They classify “themselves” as biracial, and that identification is based on their having parents who belong to different races. Since they have a parent of another race who not only created them; but raised them, there is no other basis to classify themselves as anything differently than biracial. In this particular case though, while these two individuals might “look black” to some, their white parentage was/is present in their genes and manifested itself through one of their offspring (who is definitely beyond being light skinned).

Now back to the heritage of the Igbo bride, she could be very well be biracial. I really have no way of telling and I don’t really care! It isn’t important to the topic of Igbo wedding traditions. However if she is biracial, then I’m glad she decided to marry a black man, instead of continuing her black parent’s example of diluting the black race. I’ve stated before that a marriage/mating between a mulatto and a black man/woman is the only “interracial” relationship I approve of; as it is the only one that comes close to the goal of continuing the existence of the black people.

Now that this has been said….those are some beautiful outfits in that wedding aren’t they?
I don't agree with much in your post, as I find it wholly ironic when viewed in the context of your other race discussions (I do hope you don't presumptously mistake this irony with "confusion" as you did with "fascination")!

But in the spirit of common ground, I'll focus on that which I do agree.

1) You're correct, I (too) am being presumptous.

I presumed you identified the bride as black because, naturally, I would. If I saw either the african bride or the twins' mother walking in the grocery store I'd give no second thought to what percentage of non-black blood coursed their veins.... I see them both as sisters. Quietest kept, I suspect you'd do the same, as presumptous as it may be.

Which leads me to 2)
panafrica said:
I really have no way of telling and I don’t really care! It isn’t important to the topic of Igbo wedding traditions.
Ditto. But not only unimportant to Igbo weddings, but unimportant period. No real value is to be gained by defining black people out of the race, especially when you've conceeded more often than not you've "no way of telling...

PEACE brother
 

militant

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Bro Kemetkind, what Bro Pan says are not contradictory. There are natural variations among blacks in Africa, as well as variations due to mixture. And quite honetly, one cannot pin down the bride's features to pure racial mixture.

For example, my great grandfather, (whose picture I have by the way) looked almost like a morrocan. But he had no known history of recent migration. Infact his ancestry was a long line of drummers and artists in his village. His daughter, my grandmother, was referred to as "The Red Mama", because of her high yellow skin tones, again another natural variation. My brother looks like a dark brown Ethiopian with curly hair, again, another natural variation. And not all Africans have flat noses, you need to see my sister and my dad.

Now obviously these variations do not occur at an epidemic, but they do exist. I once met one of the most beautiful african woman ever, while I was a child, who was dark but had natural green eyes and brown hair.

Those women could easily have added weaves to their hair. They could have just straightened their long hair. Africans do actually have long hair.
A Fulani woman with "straight hair"
http://www.eldis.org/pastoralism/pare/gallery1/images/ELDISad06_JPG_JPG.jpg
 

I-khan

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Dec 27, 2005
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militant said:
Bro Kemetkind, what Bro Pan says are not contradictory. There are natural variations among blacks in Africa, as well as variations due to mixture. And quite honetly, one cannot pin down the bride's features to pure racial mixture.

For example, my great grandfather, (whose picture I have by the way) looked almost like a morrocan. But he had no known history of recent migration. Infact his ancestry was a long line of drummers and artists in his village. His daughter, my grandmother, was referred to as "The Red Mama", because of her high yellow skin tones, again another natural variation. My brother looks like a dark brown Ethiopian with curly hair, again, another natural variation. And not all Africans have flat noses, you need to see my sister and my dad.

Now obviously these variations do not occur at an epidemic, but they do exist. I once met one of the most beautiful african woman ever, while I was a child, who was dark but had natural green eyes and brown hair.

Those women could easily have added weaves to their hair. They could have just straightened their long hair. Africans do actually have long hair.
A Fulani woman with "straight hair"
http://www.eldis.org/pastoralism/pare/gallery1/images/ELDISad06_JPG_JPG.jpg
YESSSSSSSS, militant I a very familiar with the phenotypical variations of black people in Afrika and abroad.Not all black Afrikans have nappy hair and big lips,or and overbite(progmatism). I knew an absolutey BEAUTIFULL woman from southern Ethiopia whom had straight hair and whose ancestors(according to her) came from Congo.
 

panafrica

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kemetkind said:
I presumed you identified the bride as black because, naturally, I would. If I saw either the african bride or the twins' mother walking in the grocery store I'd give no second thought to what percentage of non-black blood coursed their veins.... I see them both as sisters. Quietest kept, I suspect you'd do the same, as presumptous as it may be.
I assume "black looking" people are black until given evidence to the countrary. When I am presented with this evidence, I do not stubbornly hold on to my original assumption (especially since this correction is usually made by the individual themselves).

kemetkind said:
No real value is to be gained by defining black people out of the race, especially when you've conceeded more often than not you've "no way of telling...PEACE brother
Again I act on the information "voluntarily" presented. That being said, most people of mixed race have no problems telling people their heritage. Indeed they are often quite proud of it (just as I'm proud of my blackness and nothing else). This pride and heritage is often not only evident in their politics but their social behavior as well. Both of which usually stands in direct opposition to not only where the black community needs to go for its prosperity but continued existance! How so you might ask? I'll tell you: There is a major difference between a black person who is light and one who is mulatto (even if they look similar in appearance). The mulatto calls a white person (or a non-black) mother or father. As a result they have the same identity, loyalty, and sympathy towards the community that produced their parent, that any other person naturally would identify with; be loyal to; and sympathize with one of their parents. The black person who is light does not have this issue because they call black people mother and father. That is the difference, and that difference makes all the difference in the world!
 

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