Black Muslims : Good days and mage

noor100

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"And by Al-Bait-ul-Ma'mur [the house over the heavens parallel to the Ka'bah at Makkah], continuously visited by the angels." Surah52-ayat 4

 

macoo

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The Five Pillars of Islam
.

1) Faith | 2) Prayer | 3) The 'Zakat'
4) The Fast | 5) Pilgrimage (Hajj)

There is no god worthy of worship except God and Muhammad is His messenger.





The principle in Islam regarding Hajj is that if one has debt, and if after paying that debt, there is not enough funds left for one to perform the Hajj, then the pilgrimage of Hajj is not obligatory on that person.

Hajj is only obligatory on a person, if he can afford to do so; after paying all his debts. It is better and purer for the person to pay and clear his debts, than to perform the Hajj pilgrimage. And it is not permissible that a person stops paying his installments, to save for the Hajj pilgrimage; unless, of course, the person whom he owes the money, of his/her own free will and without any pressure, allows the person to delay the payment of the debt, to facilitate the Hajj of the debtor. But if the one who is owed the money, demands his/her money; then it is purer for the person to arrange to pay the debt, and delay his Hajj for the following year.



The annual pilgrimage to Makkah - the Hajj - is an obligation only for those who are physically and financially able to perform it. Nevertheless, about two million people go to Makkah each year from every corner of the globe providing a unique opportunity for those of different nations to meet one another. Although Makkah is always filled with visitors, the annual Hajj begins in the twelfth month of the Islamic year (which is lunar, not solar, so that Hajj and Ramadan fall sometimes in summer, sometimes in winter). Pilgrims wear special clothes: simple garments which strip away distinctions of class and culture, so that all stand equal before God.


Some examples


1. The ruling regarding proceeding for Hajj while having an interest based impermissible loan.
2. The validity of having an interest based loan in western non muslim majority countries.
3. The validity of Hajj, while making interest based payments, upon one's return from Hajj.



Hajj While Having an Interest Based Loan

Hajj is only obligatory upon those who are free from debt. However if one wishes to proceed while still being in a state of debt, it is permissible. If the dept is interest based, it would be wise to first pay off the debt and then proceed for Hajj.

"As a right of Allah, it is obligatory on the people to perform Hajj of the House - on everyone who has the ability to manage (his) way to it". (Holy Quran 3:97)

Imam Hasan Shurunbulali in Nur Al Idah and Imam Fakhruddin Al Razi in Al Tafseer Al Kabeer have listed 'paying all outstanding debts'as one of the conditions for Hajj to become fardh (mandatory). (See Nur Al Idah and Al Tafseer Al Kabeer)

Interest Based Loans / Mortgages in Non Muslim Majority Countries

The statement that "it is the law of the land to pay interest" is inaccurate. compelling citizens to purchase homes through interest based loans. In fact, there are various halal alternatives such as Islamic financing and living in rent etc.

Paying Interest / Usury After Returning From Hajj

From amongst the objectives of Hajj is to renew one's commitment to adhere to all Quranic injunctions and abandon all wrong.

Imam Abu Bakr Jaabir Al Jazaairi writes "From the wisdom of Hajj and Umrah, is to purify oneself from the effects of sin, so that one becomes worthy of the honour of Almighty Allah, particularly in the abode hereafter" (Minhaj Al Muslim).

Therefore, deliberately engaging in sin after one's Hajj would not be appropriate. Despite this, it should be noted that the obligation of Hajj will be fulfilled, even though one may commit sin after one's return from Hajj.

 

macoo

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Prophet Ibrahim built this House for devout worship to one God. But within his lifetime people disobeyed his orders and began to put idols inside the Kaaba. Ibrahim had to clean the House of these idols and of Idle worshippers. He told the people that this was a symbolic house of God. God does not live there for He is everywhere. People did not understand this logic and no sooner had Ibrahim died the people, out of reverence, filled the place with idols again. They thronged to this place annually and


worshipped their personal gods, It was over Four Thousand years later that the last of the line of prophet (SA), Muhammad Ibne Abdullah entered Makka triumphantly, went inside the Ka�aba and, with the help of his cousin and son in law Ali Ibne Abi Talib, (AS) destroyed all the idols of Ka�aba with their own hands.



Allaah The Almighty preserved the Ka‘bah:



The following incident is mentioned in Surah Feel of the Holy Quran and it happened during the period of the birth-year of Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him). Abraha Al-Ashram was the governor of Yemen on behalf of the king of Ethiopia. He (Abrahah) thought to build a house (like the Kabah at Makkah) in Sana (the capital of Yemen) and call the Arabs to perform the pilgrimage there in Sana instead of the Kabah in Makkah, with the intention of diverting the trade and benefits from Makkah to Yemen. He presented his idea to the king of Ethiopia who agreed to it. So the house (church) was built and he named it Al-Qullais; there was no church of its like at that time.


Then a man from the Quraish tribe of Makkah came there and was infuriated by it, so he relieved his nature (stools and urine) in it, soiled its walls and went away. When Abrahah Al-Ashram saw that, he could not control his anger and raised an army to invade Makkah and demolish the Kabah. He had in that army thirteen elephants and amongst them was an elephant called Mahmud which was the biggest of them. So that army proceeded and none amongst the Arab tribes that faced them (fought against them) but was killed and defeated, till it approached near



Makkah. Then there took place negotiations between Abrahah Al-Ashram and the chief of Makkah (Abdul Muttalib bin Hashim, the grandfather of the Prophet), and it was concluded that Abrahah would restore the camels of Abdul Muttalib which he had taken away, and then he (Abrahah) would decide himself as regards the Kabah. Abdul Muttalib ordered the men of Makkah to evacuate the city and go to the top of the mountains along with their wives and children in case some harm should come to them from the invading oppressors. Then that army moved towards



Makkah till they reached valley Muhassir. While the army was marching towards Makkah, in the middle of the valley, suddenly it was overtaken by flocks of birds, flocks after flocks, air-raiding that army with small stones slightly bigger than a lentil seed. There never fell a stone on a soldier except it dissolved his flesh and burst it into pieces. So they perished with a total destruction. Abrahah Al-Ashram fled away while his flesh was bursting into pieces till he died on the way (back to Yemen). Such was the victory bestowed by Allah, (the All-Majestic, All-Powerful) to the people of Makkah and such was the protection provided by Him for His House (Kabah in Makkah)

 

macoo

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Now


More than 2 million people surround me. We all have one common goal, one purpose for being here together. I do not stand out from anyone else. There are no signs of wealth or greatness upon me. No Rolex watch or Nike shoes to mark me as a rich person. I am one person alone, in a sea of humanity. I am black or white, yellow or brown, the colour of my skin is not important. I am from Europe or Asia or South America, my homeland is any corner of this wide earth. The people around me are young and old, male and female, rich and poor. We represent humankind in our diversity, yet we are united. We are unity in diversity.
I am at Hajj

Hajj is one of the five pillars of Islam. Muslims declare that there is no god worthy of worship but Allah and that Muhammad is His messenger; they pray, they fast, they pay obligatory charity, and they go to Hajj. Hajj is a pilgrimage to the city of Makah in Saudi Arabia. At the mosque and in the surrounding area, Muslims perform prayers and rituals. Hajj is an obligatory act performed once in a lifetime by all mentally, physically, and financially able Muslims.

“And Hajj (pilgrimage to Makah) to the House (Kaba) is a duty that mankind owes to God, those who can afford the expenses (for one’s conveyance, provision and residence) ; and whoever disbelieves then God stands not in need of any of mankind, jinn and all that exists” (Quran 3:97)
Muslims from all over the world will gather to worship God. They arrive in Saudi Arabia, by plane, bus, car, etc. Some endure great hardship, others merely buy a first class ticket, but they come as equals. People make this journey prepared to stand at the House of God (or Kaba) and affirm their love for God and His religion of Islam.

“And proclaim to humankind the Hajj (pilgrimage). They will come to you on foot and on every lean camel, they will come from every deep and distant (wide) mountain highway (to perform Hajj)” (Quran 22:27)

The Hajj is several days of total devotion to the One God. Muslims come together to celebrate His praises, ask for His forgiveness and demonstrate unity for His sake alone.

Throughout the Muslim world, Hajj has come to symbolise unity. Although Muslims may be disunited due to many outside influences, such as money, politics, border disputes or other worldly concerns. Hajj is the great leveller. At Hajj, all Muslims are equal; nothing about the rituals they perform makes one person better than another.

More than 2 million Muslims stand in one place, wearing the same simple clothing, following the same rituals and saying the same words. They are united in their devotion to God. The black man stands next to the white man and they call on God with one voice. The king stands beside the pauper and they declare their submission to the will of God using the same words.

Muslims from every corner of the globe are united in their submission to the will of God. They cry out as if with one voice, “Here I am O God, here I am at your service, and You have no partner. Here I am. All praise, grace, and dominion belong to You. You have no partner”. This supplication is said repeatedly by the pilgrims. It is their answer to God’s call for the Muslims to perform Hajj.

These words are repeated with joy and reverence by all, regardless of status or class. Some people are so overcome with emotion that they weep, others feel elated and happier then they have ever felt before. Every person there feels that he is one person, alone among millions answering God’s call and God hears his supplication and sees his arrival. The pilgrims feel amazed that they are the guest of the most Merciful God. He or she attends this gathering by the invitation of God, not at the invitation of a government or an organisation, nor at the request of a family member or friend.

Hajj is performed because God has invited the believers to congregate together. Regardless of place of birth, nationality, ethnicity, gender, or status, all are welcome, and all are equal in the sight of God. The Muslims gather to meet one another and demonstrate to each other, and the world that they are united. Unity in diversity. They are united by their worship of One God.

“O humankind! We have created you from a male and a female, and made you into nations and tribes, that you may know one another. Verily, the most honourable of you with God is that (believer) who has At-Taqwa (piety, God consciousness). Verily, God is All-Knowing, All-Aware.” (Quran 39:13)

Islam is the religion of unity. Repeatedly throughout the Quran God reminds the believers that they must remain united and seek strength through unity. Hajj epitomises this unity. People from every race and colour come together in submission to the will of God. Muslims are one brotherhood and they come together with a sense of purpose and a desire for peace.

“The believers are nothing else but brothers (in Islam). So make reconciliation between your brothers, and fear God, that you may receive mercy.” (Quran 39:10)

“And hold fast, all of you together, to the Rope of God (this Quran), and be not divided among yourselves, and remember God’s Favour on you, for you were enemies one to another but He joined your hearts together, so that, by His Grace, you became brethren (in Islam), and you were on the brink of a pit of Fire, and He saved you from it. Thus God makes His Ayat (proofs, evidences, verses, lessons, signs, revelations, etc.,) clear to you, that you may be guided.” (Quran 3:103)

Hajj is the largest annual gathering of Muslims; it is the largest gathering of people united by the peacefulness and serenity that is Islam. Anything that disturbs the peacefulness of Hajj is prohibited. No matter what is happening in the material world at Hajj, peace prevails.

Muslims gather together and their diversity is a wonder to behold. The old stand with the young, the rich stand with the poor, people of all colours and nationalities stand shoulder to shoulder in prayer, and perform rituals side by side. Prophet Muhammad, may the mercy and blessings of God be upon him, said, “In their love, kindness, and compassion for each other, the believers are like a human body.[1] Muslims at Hajj are one people, they are a soothing sea of humanity, gathered together to worship One God. Muslims turn their faces in one direction and submit to the will of God. They are united by their love of God, and united in their diversity.

Pilgrimage (Hajj) in Makkah with TheDeenShow

An American In Mecca

22 Born American who converted to Islam and went to Hajj
 

macoo

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The twelfth month of the Islamic calendar is called Dhul Hijjah. It is the month that contains one of the greatest pillars of Islam – Hajj or the major pilgrimage. It also contains one of only two Islamic reoccurring festivals, Eid ul Adha. These two special occasions, the Hajj and Eid ul Adha, are inextricably linked by one special man, Prophet Ibrahim, known in Jewish and Christian traditions as Prophet Abraham.

Making the pilgrimage is often called following in the footsteps of Ibrahim. This is due to the fact that the rituals involved in the pilgrimage replicate many of the events in Prophet Ibrahim’s life. Eid ul Adha commemorates a specific trial in the life of Ibrahim. He was commanded by God to sacrifice, his son Ishmael. Eid ul Adha occurs on the 10th day of Dhul Hijjah, the day on which most of the Hajj rites have been preformed and the pilgrims slaughter an animal to honour Prophet Ibrahim’s obedience to God.

“Surely Ibrahim was an example, obedient to God, by nature upright, and he was not of the polytheists. He was grateful for Our bounties. We chose him and guided him unto a right path. We gave him good in this world, and in the next he will most surely be among the righteous.” (Quran 16:120-121)

In a divinely inspired dream, Ibrahim saw himself sacrificing his son Ishmael. All members of Ibrahim’s family demonstrated complete trust in God, therefore Ibrahim revealed the dream to Ishmael. He readily agreed that his father must carry out the command of God. Together they went to the place of sacrifice and offered Ishmael’s life to God. Ibrahim prepared to sacrifice his beloved son. At this point the shaytaan (satan) tempted Ibrahim trying to make him disobey God, but Ibrahim resisted and drove the shaytaan away. Ibrahim looked down at his son for what he believed was the last time but as the blade came close to Ishmael’s neck God stayed his hand and revealed that there was no need for Ibrahim to continue. His sacrifice had already been fulfilled.

Giving up something big for the sake of God, such as the life of your child, must seem like a huge and unimaginable sacrifice. Today even going without something small, such as a cup of coffee, to donate the money to charity seems like a large sacrifice. Try to imagine how Ibrahim must have felt as he held the blade above his child’s neck. In the last moment he was relieved of his duty to follow God’s commands. Having complete trust in God, knowing with certainty that God knows and wants what is best for us is often difficult, but it should not be.

“…And whosoever fears God and keeps his duty to Him, He will make a way for him to get out (from every difficulty). And He will provide him from (sources) he never could imagine….” (Quran 65:2-3)

God replaced Ishmael with a sheep and it is for this reason that Muslims sacrifice an animal on the celebration of Eid ul Adha; however it is more than a celebration, it is a reminder. We are reminded of our own submission to the will of God. Those Muslim’s who are not making the pilgrimage and who can afford it sacrifice an animal in remembrance of Prophet Ibrahim’s test.

“Their meat will not reach Allah, nor will their blood, but what reaches Him is piety from you….” (Quran 22:37)

The act of animal sacrifice is often misunderstood. God has no need for the blood or the meat; in fact God has no need for any of our acts of worship. However for our own benefit God commands us to turn to Him and obey Him. God looks for our piety, our goodness and our charity. The animal sacrificed is usually a sheep, a goat or a cow.

Distributing the meat from the sacrifice of Eid al-Adha strengthens many of our efforts to please God with our piety. Usually, a portion is eaten by the immediate family and relatives, a portion is given away to friends and neighbours and a portion is donated to the poor. The act symbolizes our willingness to give up our bounties to strengthen ties of kinship and friendship and our enthusiasm to give up things that are of benefit to us in order to help those who are in need. In the sacrifice we recognize that all blessings come from God.

Eid ul Adha commences on the 10th day of Dhul Hijjah. For those who are not at the pilgrimage, it begins with an extra early morning prayer performed in congregation, called the Eid prayer. It is a time of celebration, a time to visit family and friends and thank God for all the blessings He has bestowed upon us. It demands contact with relatives, kindness to family and neighbours, and empathy and compassion for the poor. Above all Eid ul Adha reminds us that God is great and that He is the source of all bounties. Through the good times and the trying times God is the source of all comfort and all peace, and submission to Him brings the greatest benefits of all.

IAMC Eid ul Adha 2013 Khutbah:: Nouman Ali Khan: The Sacrifice of Prophet Ibrahim
 
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