Food Discussion : Do we eat for taste or substance?

What are we eating, do we know?


  • Total voters
    4

houserunner

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Feb 12, 2010
1,072
1,155
Houserunner, I agree with you in many ways. Truth is i am trying to see were we went wrong in our eating habbits. Every pet i've ever had from the pet store came with a strict diet plan. I can feed a snake rabbit as food, but i cant feed a snake rabbit food. My point is when i was "brought" here my natural diet was not.

I dont even know how i'm effected by a prolong stay out of my natural environment meaning even though we have traveled all over the world should we live here? I mean doesn't that change the nature of the best? Did europeans have cancer spots in europe? where there's no sun?
I understand where you are coming from.
 

Emortalist

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jul 30, 2012
48
16
Sometimes it makes me salivate. I've put fruit in my mouth before to taste it out of curiousity. I mostly eat for that nice full feeling you get after a meal. It's purpose is to keep me alive (which is the very basic reason why we eat food). The name of my food is called Jevity 1.2 Cal.

Calories per can: 285

Nutrients per 8 fl Oz. (one can):

Protein
Fat
Carbohydrate
Dietary Fiber
L-Carnitine
Taurine
Water
Vitamins A,D,E,K,C, (Thiamin) B1, (Riboflavin) B2, B6, B12
Folic Acid
Niacin
Choline
Biotin Pantothenic Acid
SOdium
POtassium
Chloride
Calcium
Phosphorus
Magnesium
Iodine
Manganese
Copper
Zinc
Iron
Selenium
Chromium
Molybdenum

Ingredients:

Water, Corn maltodextrin, Corn syrup solids, sodium and calcium caseinate, soy protein isolate, canola oil, corn oil, fructooligosacharides, Medium chain triglycerides, soy fiber, oat fiber, calcium Phosphate, magnesium Phosphate, Potassium citrate, gum arabic, soy lecithin, Potassium Chloride, Sodium Citrate, L-Carnitine, Taurine, Zinc Sulfate, dl-Alpha-Tocopheryl Acetate, Ferrous Sulfate, Niacinamide, Calcium Pantothenate, Magnanese Sulfate, Cupric Sulfate, Thiamine Chloride Hydrochloride, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin, Beta-carotene, Vitamin A Palmitate, Folid Acid, Biotin, Chromium Chloride, Sodium Mybdate, Potassium Iodine, Sodium Selenate, Phylloquinone, Cyanocobalmin and Vitamin D
Thanks, for the detailed response.
 

NNQueen

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Feb 9, 2001
6,968
1,645
What do you think about this article?

"In order to assess how cultural influences have affected the African-American diet, it is necessary to look briefly at the history of African-Americans in the United States. In her article, “Where Settlers, Slaves and Natives Converged, a Way of Eating Was Born,” Geneva Collins (2007) discussed the history of southern cuisine. According to her article, a convergence of different types of foods caused by the cultural fusion of the English settlers, Native Americans, and African slaves was the basis of Southern cuisine.

The African slaves learned how to fry, boil, and roast dishes using pork, pork fat, corn, sweet potatoes, and local green leafy vegetables which were the styles of cooking used by the British, French, Americans, and Spanish (Collins, 2007, p. F01). The Native Americans influenced a lot of the cooking techniques and dishes prepared by the African slaves. Typical southern cuisine; such as corn pudding, pumpkin pie, Brunswick stew, and hominy grits; are examples of this influence.The African slaves brought black-eyed peas and rice, yams, okra, and watermelon from their country (“History,” 2006).

A lot of the foods that Black Americans eat today are influenced by the dominant American culture. The typical Western diet consists of high amounts of fat and salt, and meals are centered around meat instead of vegetables. In her article “Soul Fooled? Eating ‘Black’ May Be Healthier than You Think,” Egypt Freeman (1996) described this issue. She mentioned that the original African slave diet consisted of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. The African slaves also cooked their food over open pits or fireplaces. This healthier way of eating persisted over many decades until more Black Americans became acclimated to the dominant Western culture.

According to Lauren Schwann, M.S., R.D., a Pennsylvania based nutritional consultant, African-Americans in the early part of the century “weren’t as reliant upon processed and refined foods… Sharecroppers ate off the land and even black folks who traveled to the cities still kept gardens to grow fresh fruits and vegetables” (in Freeman, 1996). A U.S. Department of Agriculture survey found that African-American adults obtained about 35 percent of their calories from fat and 12 percent from saturated fat. Nutrition experts say that 30 percent or less of calories should be from fat (Clark, 1999, p. C10). These results are partly because of African-Americans adopting more of the eating habits of the dominant Western culture."

"Can the African-American Diet be Made Healthier Without Giving Up Culture?"
 

Emortalist

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jul 30, 2012
48
16
peace

Info-MoetRy is a brother.
LMAO, sorry about that bra
So you were at the march? what did you get from it? I got some T-shirts and a watered down speech from Farrakan. Now that I know so much more, i could have at the least gotten a book list.
I went to connect with liked minded brothers to work on a plan to start our own schools with a curriculum that would catapult us to a different understanding of what was important to learn with a plan and a goal, then execute it. A plan to open our own Hospitals. For some brothers to realize that we have to police ourselves and our communities. You know? Not like but definitely in the same way "jewish" americans have their communities set up all over this country (own police force, hospitals, schools).

Again pardon the mix up
 

NNQueen

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Feb 9, 2001
6,968
1,645
Another quote from the article...

"Many cookbooks and soul food restaurants have started to modify traditional soul food recipes so that they are healthier. It is also important to involve the Black community in educating others on nutrition. This can be done at beauty shops, barber shops, schools, civic organizations, churches, etc. (Dixon, 1997, p. 3B). Many nutritional experts agree that it is important to have a diet with as much variety as possible. Black Americans can be encouraged to use other types of greens in addition to collards. Many substitute foods are rich in needed nutrients. It is important that they reduce the amount of dairy that they consume and eat less meat with their meals. The early Africans had a rich diet of whole grains, vegetables, and fruits, and it would be beneficial for modern day African-Americans to be aware of that fact. It would be beneficial because they would be able to eat healthy without feeling that they are giving up their culture."

"Can the African-American Diet be Made Healthier Without Giving Up Culture?"
 

NNQueen

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Feb 9, 2001
6,968
1,645
LMAO, sorry about that bra
So you were at the march? what did you get from it? I got some T-shirts and a watered down speech from Farrakan. Now that I know so much more, i could have at the least gotten a book list.
I went to connect with liked minded brothers to work on a plan to start our own schools with a curriculum that would catapult us to a different understanding of what was important to learn with a plan and a goal, then execute it. A plan to open our own Hospitals. For some brothers to realize that we have to police ourselves and our communities. You know? Not like but definitely in the same way "jewish" americans have their communities set up all over this country (own police force, hospitals, schools).

Again pardon the mix up
This would be a great topic for another thread! :)
 

Emortalist

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jul 30, 2012
48
16
Thanks, for the detailed response.

Hey Sophia
I dont know your situation, but there is a brother you may want to look into Dr. Sebi. Have you heard of him? www.drsebiproducts.com

I'm trying to get my sisters away from the "doctors" (she has Lupus) and to imbrace his understanding of the body and food.
 

Emortalist

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jul 30, 2012
48
16
What do you think about this article?

"In order to assess how cultural influences have affected the African-American diet, it is necessary to look briefly at the history of African-Americans in the United States. In her article, “Where Settlers, Slaves and Natives Converged, a Way of Eating Was Born,” Geneva Collins (2007) discussed the history of southern cuisine. According to her article, a convergence of different types of foods caused by the cultural fusion of the English settlers, Native Americans, and African slaves was the basis of Southern cuisine.

The African slaves learned how to fry, boil, and roast dishes using pork, pork fat, corn, sweet potatoes, and local green leafy vegetables which were the styles of cooking used by the British, French, Americans, and Spanish (Collins, 2007, p. F01). The Native Americans influenced a lot of the cooking techniques and dishes prepared by the African slaves. Typical southern cuisine; such as corn pudding, pumpkin pie, Brunswick stew, and hominy grits; are examples of this influence.The African slaves brought black-eyed peas and rice, yams, okra, and watermelon from their country (“History,” 2006).

A lot of the foods that Black Americans eat today are influenced by the dominant American culture. The typical Western diet consists of high amounts of fat and salt, and meals are centered around meat instead of vegetables. In her article “Soul Fooled? Eating ‘Black’ May Be Healthier than You Think,” Egypt Freeman (1996) described this issue. She mentioned that the original African slave diet consisted of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. The African slaves also cooked their food over open pits or fireplaces. This healthier way of eating persisted over many decades until more Black Americans became acclimated to the dominant Western culture.

According to Lauren Schwann, M.S., R.D., a Pennsylvania based nutritional consultant, African-Americans in the early part of the century “weren’t as reliant upon processed and refined foods… Sharecroppers ate off the land and even black folks who traveled to the cities still kept gardens to grow fresh fruits and vegetables” (in Freeman, 1996). A U.S. Department of Agriculture survey found that African-American adults obtained about 35 percent of their calories from fat and 12 percent from saturated fat. Nutrition experts say that 30 percent or less of calories should be from fat (Clark, 1999, p. C10). These results are partly because of African-Americans adopting more of the eating habits of the dominant Western culture."

"Can the African-American Diet be Made Healthier Without Giving Up Culture?"
Thank you, I will pass this on.
 

info-moetry

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Dec 20, 2004
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The rotten Apple
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"In order to assess how cultural influences have affected the African-American diet, it is necessary to look briefly at the history of African-Americans in the United States. In her article, “Where Settlers, Slaves and Natives Converged, a Way of Eating Was Born,” Geneva Collins (2007) discussed the history of southern cuisine. According to her article, a convergence of different types of foods caused by the cultural fusion of the English settlers, Native Americans, and African slaves was the basis of Southern cuisine.


A lot of the foods that Black Americans eat today are influenced by the dominant American culture. The typical Western diet consists of high amounts of fat and salt, and meals are centered around meat instead of vegetables.


"Can the African-American Diet be Made Healthier Without Giving Up Culture?"
What do you think about this article?
It's an interesting read, but i disagree with most of it and i think she's romantacizing slavery just a lil' bit.

The African slaves learned how to fry, boil, and roast dishes using pork, pork fat, corn, sweet potatoes, and local green leafy vegetables which were the styles of cooking used by the British, French, Americans, and Spanish (Collins, 2007, p. F01).
- For instance, in this statement she fails to mention what area of the world our ancestors were in at the time they supposedly 'learned' how to do these things. I mean, is she trying to imply that they only learned how to make fire also from the British, French, Americans and spanish? lol


The Native Americans influenced a lot of the cooking techniques and dishes prepared by the African slaves. Typical southern cuisine; such as corn pudding, pumpkin pie, Brunswick stew, and hominy grits; are examples of this influence.The African slaves brought black-eyed peas and rice, yams, okra, and watermelon from their country (“History,” 2006).
- I don't remember seeing, or reading about our ancestors being shackled but still able to carry basket's full of Rice, yams or anything else with them. I could just see it now one of our ancestors telling the slave catcher. "yo, hold up a minute white boy, i have some more pumpkin pie and watermelon to go grab before we take this trip you were kind enough to invite us on".


In her article “Soul Fooled? Eating ‘Black’ May Be Healthier than You Think,” Egypt Freeman (1996) described this issue. She mentioned that the original African slave diet consisted of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. The African slaves also cooked their food over open pits or fireplaces. This healthier way of eating persisted over many decades until more Black Americans became acclimated to the dominant Western culture.[/QUOTE] - Our ancestors did not do this on any grand scale until after the so called emancipation, not during slavery. They weren't allowed to have ShARP utensil's in the field and i'm sure they were even limited in the big house. Notice how she calls them AFRICAN SLAVES who ate healthier, then calls them BlACK AMERICANS after she claims they were acclimated.

In this lye's the reason most of us consider ourselves to be AFRICAN -AMERICAN. Simply because of your diet! When we fell prey to the enemies diet, it changed our physiology and with that change we sub-concioulsy knew we could no longer use our original names because we were no longer eating like original people are supposed to eat. Therefore, no longer thinking and living like original people are supposed to think and live, so we sub-concioulsy felt the need to embrace the term AMERICAN as our last name to describe the much lower vibration we have settled for.

According to Lauren Schwann, M.S., R.D., a Pennsylvania based nutritional consultant, African-Americans in the early part of the century “weren’t as reliant upon processed and refined foods… Sharecroppers ate off the land and even black folks who traveled to the cities still kept gardens to grow fresh fruits and vegetables” (in Freeman, 1996). A U.S. Department of Agriculture survey found that African-American adults obtained about 35 percent of their calories from fat and 12 percent from saturated fat. Nutrition experts say that 30 percent or less of calories should be from fat (Clark, 1999, p. C10). These results are partly because of African-Americans adopting more of the eating habits of the dominant Western culture."
- this is absoulutely not true. Most of the reason 'african-americans', especially farmers were targeted and had their lands taken from under them forcing them and their families to have to 'adopt' to different means for survival. There are black people all over the south who still keep gardens and eat off of the land, but as far as bartering with their neighbors like they used to, not on a grand scale.
 

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