Black People : Black and GREEN

cherryblossom

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http://growingpower.org/

Growing Power is a national nonprofit organization and land trust supporting people from diverse backgrounds, and the environments in which they live, by helping to provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities. Growing Power implements this mission by providing hands-on training, on-the-ground demonstration, outreach and technical assistance through the development of Community Food Systems that help people grow, process, market and distribute food in a sustainable manner. You can also read more at our BLOG: www.growingpower.org/blog

William Edward Allen (born February 8, 1949) is an urban farmer based in Milwaukee and a retired American basketball player. He grew up on a farm in Rockville, Maryland with his parents and siblings, but while on the farm, he made a makeshift basketball court and taught himself to play. When he played for the middle school team, he was a huge and powerful kid and proved to be unstoppable.[4]

When he entered high school, he was 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) and 230 pounds, and he dominated as he could dunk since he was in middle school. His sophomore year he nominated to the All-Metropolitan team, and the following year, he brought his team to the finals and they won. In his senior season, he helped bring them back to the finals, but they would lose in the championship game. This season would give him a selection to the All-Pro team and a scholarship to the University of Miami. He was integral in keeping the 1970-1971 basketball season alive. The Board of Trustees tried to shut down the program in the 1969-1970 season. With Allen rallying his teammates on a strike and press conference, and the fact that his teammates and him did not have enough notice to transfer schools, the Board agreed to keep it open for another season.[5]

He was drafted in the fourth round (60th pick overall) in the 1971 NBA Draft by the Baltimore Bullets. He would never play an NBA game, but would go on the ABA's Miami Floridians and then for Belgium in the European Professional League. While in Belgium, he cultivated an old passion: farming. He would retire from basketball at the age of 28. He moved back to the United States and found work at Marcus Corporation and eventually Procter & Gamble. When he quit P&G, he received a severance package, and with it bought a tractor and 100 acres (0.40 km2), to raise his three kids with his wife.[6]

He started with the 100 acres (0.40 km2), and nine years later he bought a 2-acre (8,100 m2) lot on the north side of Milwaukee that was a derelict plant nursery that was in foreclosure.[7][8] In 1995, a YMCA group asked him to how to make a small organic garden profitable, and from that, Farm City Link was formed. After ideas suggested by Heifer Project International to help expand, and a couple years of little profitability, Hope Finkelstein offered to merge her Growing Power with Farm City Links, as they both had the same goals. He accepted and became co-director. This merger would bring much success to them, as they won both Ford Foundation and the MacArthur Foundation "Genius Grant".[9] Growing Power also has a branch in Chicago, run by Allen's daughter Erika. He is still currently director of Growing Power

Personal farming/Farm City Link (1982–1998)Will Allen’s parents were sharecroppers in South Carolina until they bought the small vegetable farm in Rockville, Maryland, where Allen grew up.[10][20] After owning the farmland , nine years later he was ready to expand his operation. There was a 2-acre (8,100 m2) plot located on the north side of Milwaukee that was a derelict plant nursery that was in foreclosure.[7][8] In what once was called Greenhouse Alley, he made a greenhouse of his own, and it was the last remaining farmland in the city and was in the middle of a low-income neighborhood. Will's Roadside Stand became a popular for its organic output, and at this time he established the Rainbow Grower's Cooperative, which connected family farmers outside Milwaukee to the city.[8]

In 1995, a nearby YMCA group came to Allen on how to make a small organic garden profitable. He had a half-acre of unused land behind the greenhouse that he offered. Soon enough, the kids got to work and crops began to grow, and it also gave Allen a chance to mentor. "I talked to them about how the garden was teaching basic life skills: how to get up in the morning, how to be responsible for growing something."[21] With his help, Farm City Link was formed.[21]

Then in 1996, he was approached by Heifer Project International and was given some ideas on how Farm City Link could expand. They told him to set up a tilapia fish farm of 150, putting red worms to enrich the soil of the vegetable beds, and using hydroponics system to help grow plants. Allen was eager about all these ideas and used them right away.[22]

When it first began, it struggled financially. One of the biggest problems was growing a massive amount of crops in a small amount of space. He raised the vegetable beds to make room to raise the chickens, ducks, goats, and farmed fish. Allen was at a crossroad: Should he remain productive or train new farmers. In 1998, his answer came in the form of Hope Finkelstein, an organizer and activist. She had formed Growing Power, and since the two organizations were so similar, she asked that the two merge, with Allen becoming co-director.[23]

Growing Power (199:cool:The name "Growing Power" was ideal, as it matched up with his goal to "grow communities by growing sustainablie food sources." 1999 saw the building once known as "Will's Roadside Stand" turn into Growing Power's Community Food Center, where farmers of all ages and experience come to receive training and assistance in farming practicing.[24]

A part of Growing Power is the Growing Power Youth Corps, which is a youth development apprenticeship program. The program gives kids from low-income backgrounds academic and professional experience by learning different farming methods, developing leadership experience, build entrepreneurial skills, and learn to work with a wide range of people.[25]

As Growing Power came to fulfill its name, they selected Chicago as the next city to start another program. They selected Allen's eldest daughter, Erika, to run it. The new branch opened in February 2002 and established more Community Food Centers. He said of his daughter that "People admire Erika's intelligence and grasp. But her commitment and passion are incredible, and that's what it really takes." In this year, Growing Power was producing over 100,000 pounds of chemical-free vegetables and growing rapidly.[25]


Will Allen nets Tilapia at the urban farm Growing Power in 2008.By 2005, he was in need of funding, and he won the Ford Foundation Leadership for a Changing World Award, which came with an $100,000 grant from them.[25]

In 2008, Allen would receive the genius grant MacArthur Foundation "Genius Grant". The award came with a $500,000 grant for "individuals across all ages and fields who show exceptional merit and promise of continued creative work."[25] The award statement said the following about Allen: "Will Allen is an urban farmer who is transforming the cultivation, production, and delivery of healthy foods to underserved, urban populations...Allen is expirementing with new and creative ways to improve the diet and health of the urban poor."[26]

After this, he was interviewed by Good Morning America, CNN, NPR, and the New York Times. He had gone overseas to train people in Africa, Europe, and South America. His staff and had increased to three dozen full time employees, he owned five greenhouses, and produced $500,000 annually from fresh, organic food.[27]

Allen currently serves as director of Growing Power, a now mature urban farming project in Milwaukee, with a 40-acre (160,000 m2) acre farm west of Milwaukee in the town of Merton and an off-shoot project in Chicago run by Allen's daughter, Erika.[10][11]

Awards
In 2005, Allen was awarded a Ford Foundation leadership grant on behalf of his urban farming work.[7][11] In 2008, he was awarded the MacArthur Foundation "Genius Grant" for his work on urban farming and sustainable food production.[11][28] Most recently, in 2009, the Kellogg Foundation gave Allen a grant to create jobs in urban agriculture
 

cherryblossom

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Goodwell's Natural Foods Market
418 W Willis St
Detroit, MI 48201


Neighborhoods: Midtown, Cass Corridor

(313) 831-2130
 

cherryblossom

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http://familyfarmed.org/oldsite/iyabo.html


Iyabo Farms
P.O Box 582
Hopkins Park, IL 60944

Johari Cole and her family farm forty-five acres about 75 miles south of Chicago near the Indiana border. Iyabo Farms’ land has been in the Cole family for twelve years and is currently in the process of becoming certified organic by the Organic Crop Improvement Association (OCIA). Johari leads farm efforts with support from her brother-in-law, Terry James; husband, S. Kweli; and two children. Farm chores include watering, weeding, greenhouse work, seeding, marketing and sales. The family grows a range of fresh produce including kale, greens, melons, tomatoes, beans, peas and lettuce.

Iyabo Farms is part of the Pembroke Farmers’ Cooperative and the Pembroke Farming Family. Pembroke Township, located within Kankakee County, has a long African-American agricultural history.
 

cherryblossom

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http://www.greendmv.org/


onealhayes.jpg

Phillip O'Neal and Rhon Hayes

Green Giants

The Washingtonian’s Green Awards honor those who protect our environment and who teach others the importance of eco-friendly living.


By Leslie Milk Published Saturday, May 01, 2010


When people hear about Green DMV, “they think we sell hybrid cars,” says Philip O’Neal. He and Rhon Hayes are founders of Green DMV—the initials stand for the District, Maryland, and Virginia— a nonprofit whose Green Job Corps trains disadvantaged people for “green” jobs doing energy audits, installing solar panels, and weatherizing buildings. One Green Job Corps graduate works at Washington Gas Energy Services. Another is working on DC weatherization projects as part of the government stimulus package. Last month, the Green Job Corps began training a new class in Alexandria.



COMPLETE ARTICLE HERE: http://www.washingtonian.com/articles/people/15646.html
 

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