Pan-Africanism : Are You African or African American?

Are You "African" or "African American?"

  • I am African.

    Votes: 83 46.4%
  • I am African American.

    Votes: 52 29.1%
  • none of the above

    Votes: 44 24.6%

  • Total voters
    179

sekou kasimu

PanAfrikanist Revolutionary
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Recent immigrants to the U.S. are black Americans. African-Americans are black Americans whose ancestry goes back to American slavery.

Unlike recent immigrants who hail from distinct tribes and particular countries on the continent, tribe Africa-America was made one from many and forged in American slavery.... not Brazilian slavery, or Jamaican slavery, but U.S. slavery.

Recent immigrants are more properly called, for ex., Nigerian-Americans, Botswanan-Americans, Ghanian-Americans. They applied for, fulfilled the citizenship requirements of and swore allegiance to the country, the United States of America, not to the tribe, Africa-America. While black Americans, they are no more African-American than an African-American who takes out Nigerian citizenship is a Yoruba.
I could not disagree with you more! The foregoing characterization and labels as to who we are is very, very divisive. And is the ultimate obstacle to unity, the precondition for liberation. Dr. John Henrik Clarke taught that the "nation state" is a European invention, left over from the days of colonialism, and now the root cause of the wars between the Afrikans in the motherland, that and foreign religions!!! Afrikans created territorial states that had loose, porous , borders, that were multi-ethnic and multi-cultural. Cultures fertilizing cultures, competing with each other to be better. Not to dominate and destroy each other like Europeans!!! Afrikans could travel from one territory to another to vote in elections all over the continent. Afrikans did not recognize the European concept "private property". The land was the collective property of all of the Afrikans, and the King's job was to make sure each Afrikan received enough land to feed his family. The guiding principle was "to each according to his or her needs", not ability to pay. That was and is the European way! I respectfully submit that those among us who are unable to embrace the label Afrikan, are still emotionally attached to our historical and traditional enemies, whites! Be they Europeans or Arabs!!!
 

sekou kasimu

PanAfrikanist Revolutionary
PREMIUM MEMBER
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794
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sowetomovement.blogspot.com
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Blackbird, I'm in agreement indeed and very well said. Also many Africans and African Americans hold stereotypes against each other which does either of us any favors but build walls between our various cultures. Actually African Americans have more in common with English speaking Caribbeans, Stokely Carmichael comes to mind and my anecdotal experiences. But I have to say Africans tend to segregate themselves from African Americans and have a more profound admiration for white people and feel they are complemented and gratified by having white friends and tend to share stereotypical stories regarding African Americans. African Americans tend to be much more suspicious of white people and not so quick to give them credit and tend not to back stab any other culture around white people, we avoid subjects that will feed their sense of superiority.

So I am African American. I do hope one day Africans and African Americans can find a more profound bond and affiliation for one another because we could actually help each other and enrich the foundation in which we exist, in fact this is my wish for all cultures because the fact is we all are divided by class
in a hierarchy social structure dominated by oligarchs and corporate plutocrats from every corner of the world.
Afrikans all over the world will bond, when Afrikans all over the world stop letting our enemies create these artificial categories, designed to keep us apart!!!!!! In ain't rocket science when you've done your homework, i.e., studied Afrikan History/Culture in depth! Come on y'all, this is 2014! 46 years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., and 20 years after Nelson Mandela was elected president of South Afrika. "History does not forgive those who lose they way"!
 

JuneBugg

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jul 29, 2002
369
247
Afrikans all over the world will bond, when Afrikans all over the world stop letting our enemies create these artificial categories, designed to keep us apart!!!!!! In ain't rocket science when you've done your homework, i.e., studied Afrikan History/Culture in depth! Come on y'all, this is 2014! 46 years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., and 20 years after Nelson Mandela was elected president of South Afrika. "History does not forgive those who lose they way"!
I live for that day and I hope to see evidence of it in my surroundings. What I do see are African churches and food stores. There is pool hall many Africans hang out but I really don't see much uniting. I see an African business culture, Africans like to own business property, there are 2 office buildings that are African owned in my area of town. I also see Chinese and Africans pooling their money together to buy business buildings and business ventures but with very few African American connections, actually I know of none. That does not mean they are not there. I see Africans actually become business partners with white people too, there is a mortgage company that is African and white owned I know of. I really appreciate pan-Africans who seek those connections and also benefit from those connections because one day a business artery will flow freely and cause the rest of the African American community to take notice and join in. But at this point I don't see it perhaps in other parts of the country it is happening. If you know tune me in. The sooner the better.

One other thing, I live in Houston and I see Africans shopping in Chinese grocery stores. I have not figured that one out yet but as I said Africans seem to want to segregate themselves from African Americans. When I go to black clubs and businesses it is rare I see an African patronizing them. I think the Pan African movement is setting the example of reaching out and I hope those efforts become hugely successful to the point we can see evidence of it in our lives.
 

Kadijah

Banned
MEMBER
Apr 7, 2013
6,131
2,927
CTJ:

Time will tell...

You wrote:

Unlike recent immigrants who hail from distinct tribes and particular countries on the continent, tribe Africa-America was made one from many and forged in American slavery.... not Brazilian slavery, or Jamaican slavery, but U.S. slavery.

CTJ:

Yes, also on point/on time, too, but I had and have contacts with others, all thruout the black disaspora, who see things as we do, as well as are striving for the same goal(s), i. e., a shared intent and purpose, unity etc., for all of our sakes...
Where in my post does it say that blacks throughout the diaspora don't see things as we do, aren't striving for the same goal(s)... for all our sakes? :huh:

You wrote:

Recent immigrants are more properly called, for ex., Nigerian-Americans, Botswanan-Americans, Ghanian-Americans. They applied for, fulfilled the citizenship requirements of and swore allegiance to the country, the United States of America, not to the tribe, Africa-America. While black Americans, they are no more African-American than an African-American who takes out Nigerian citizenship is a Yoruba.
CTJ:

The jury's out...Everybody is presumed innocent until proven guilty, i. e., it isn't about the takes of individuals, it also is about the takes of whichever people choose or chose to immigrant here, etc.

[/quote]
The jury is NOT out on immigrants hyphenating their country of origin with -American. As in Irish-American, German-American, Italian-American and :) Nigerian-American, Ghananan-American, etc., etc., etc.

Do reread brother Malcolm's' call to our people, both here and around the globe, i. e., his 'Message to the Grassroots', etc.

We need not begin again, just start fresh!

(Smile)
All good and fine, brother Chuck, but you're totally OFF TOPIC here. None of this stuff you dragged in through the back door has anything to do with my post. :)
 

chuck

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 9, 2003
13,471
2,159
CTJ

You aired your opinions, and I aired mine...

We feel and think differently about some things, I was and I am upfront about that, from the getgo...

As I've said before, let us always be able to disagree, without being disagreeable...

I and we are also role models etc.

Also do keep that in mind too...

FYI
 

Jantavanta

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Mar 14, 2014
75
22
Blackbird, I'm in agreement indeed and very well said. Also many Africans and African Americans hold stereotypes against each other which does either of us any favors but build walls between our various cultures. Actually African Americans have more in common with English speaking Caribbeans, Stokely Carmichael comes to mind and my anecdotal experiences. But I have to say Africans tend to segregate themselves from African Americans and have a more profound admiration for white people and feel they are complemented and gratified by having white friends and tend to share stereotypical stories regarding African Americans. African Americans tend to be much more suspicious of white people and not so quick to give them credit and tend not to back stab any other culture around white people, we avoid subjects that will feed their sense of superiority.

So I am African American. I do hope one day Africans and African Americans can find a more profound bond and affiliation for one another because we could actually help each other and enrich the foundation in which we exist, in fact this is my wish for all cultures because the fact is we all are divided by class
in a hierarchy social structure dominated by oligarchs and corporate plutocrats from every corner of the world.
I have observed that too. A lot of Contemporary Africans have not had the direct violent experience of interaction with White People to see the African-American view point. So it creates suspicion. White People come to Africa as highly-paid expats and go back.

Due to lack of information on how The System has worked against the minds of African-Americans. It would be shocking to many that someone was released from jail after 44 years due to Cointelpro.

But at the same time, it is amazes many that it is Whites who seem to feel freer traveling to Africa.

No, with internet, I hope there will be a bridge.
 

chuck

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 9, 2003
13,471
2,159
I have observed that too. A lot of Contemporary Africans have not had the direct violent experience of interaction with White People to see the African-American view point. So it creates suspicion. White People come to Africa as highly-paid expats and go back.

Due to lack of information on how The System has worked against the minds of African-Americans. It would be shocking to many that someone was released from jail after 44 years due to Cointelpro.

But at the same time, it is amazes many that it is Whites who seem to feel freer traveling to Africa.

No, with internet, I hope there will be a bridge.
First of all, I hope both of us view the various takes of the African/black diaspora/etc. with good hearts and open minds, etc.

Above and beyond that, some among those who only accept the black only takes, in the states in particular, either have forgotten the early history of black migration back to the motherland, or are denying the facts:

I. e., some went back with whitewashed notions, etc., and it took generations for others to topple the regimes those weren't all that different, other than their skin shades, etc.

Not to deny generations elsewhere who had to rise above/beyond/etc. white colonial ones too, but let's do tell the rest of the story, etc.

FYI
 

sekou kasimu

PanAfrikanist Revolutionary
PREMIUM MEMBER
Apr 12, 2013
3,054
794
Baltimore, Maryland
sowetomovement.blogspot.com
Occupation
Retired Ironworker
I live for that day and I hope to see evidence of it in my surroundings. What I do see are African churches and food stores. There is pool hall many Africans hang out but I really don't see much uniting. I see an African business culture, Africans like to own business property, there are 2 office buildings that are African owned in my area of town. I also see Chinese and Africans pooling their money together to buy business buildings and business ventures but with very few African American connections, actually I know of none. That does not mean they are not there. I see Africans actually become business partners with white people too, there is a mortgage company that is African and white owned I know of. I really appreciate pan-Africans who seek those connections and also benefit from those connections because one day a business artery will flow freely and cause the rest of the African American community to take notice and join in. But at this point I don't see it perhaps in other parts of the country it is happening. If you know tune me in. The sooner the better.

One other thing, I live in Houston and I see Africans shopping in Chinese grocery stores. I have not figured that one out yet but as I said Africans seem to want to segregate themselves from African Americans. When I go to black clubs and businesses it is rare I see an African patronizing them. I think the Pan African movement is setting the example of reaching out and I hope those efforts become hugely successful to the point we can see evidence of it in our lives.
To understand petty capitalist Afrikans from the Motherland, and the Disapora, read "The West and The Rest of Us" by Chinwezui, an Afrikan from Nigeria. Notice I did not label him a Nigerian! Why you are at it, read "Decolonizing the African Mind" by the same author. You cannot develope a PanAfrikanist consciousness without serious research!!! Chinwezui very adequately explains the mentally of what he refers to as the"petty bourgeois African elite", which I submit describes the "petty bourgeois black American elite"! I promise you you will be able to connect the dots and understand! Hit me back after you have read Chinwezui. P.S. The only difference between the two groups, is that the black Americans don't know that they are Afrikans,...........yet? Some may never now! Smile
 

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