Nigeria : Are We In The States Of Nigerian/Igbo And Yoruba Ancestry

Ezinne

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Sister Ezinne..

You might find the last link useful because it does mention specific family names.

:fyi:
Thanks! I'll check out the link. I believe that Igbos, like many of the groups residing in Nigeria-Cameroon areas for instance, have influenced a number of people all around the world and that the Igbo language is one of the oldest languages.
 

Omowale Jabali

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A friend of mine told me about this link, but I have not studied it in depth:

Afro-Louisiana History and Genealogy: 1718-1820

http://ibiblio.org/laslave/fields.php
Interesting results from my mom's side (paternal grandmother's).

St. Martin

http://ibiblio.org/laslave/fields3.php?pageNum=1&IDNum=3081068&actualCount=96

Caraby (also Carraby)

(Most known references are from Congo)

Here is some background info (incomplete).

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/o/n/Kevin-Michael-Connor-TX/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0017.html
 

Ezinne

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Omowale Jabali

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Omowale Jabali

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Ezinne

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Sister Ezinne I truly love the blog on the introduction to odinani you presented to me, if i may, i would like to post it here in this comment.
Brother Chinelo, he said you are free to post some excerpts here :)
 

Ezinne

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Thanks Dear Sister Ezinne!!

Check this out. It describes how many Igbos were smuggled into Louisiana territory.

http://www.driskellcenter.umd.edu/programs/2003-2004/colloq/hall/igbo.pdf

Igbo women were among the
two African ethnicities whose women had the highest proportion of surviving
children. They mated widely outside the Igbo group.
Thanks! This is interesting:

"To the west along the Texas-Louisiana border, one finds the remains of "No-Man's Land," otherwise known as the Neutral Strip, which was formerly a refuge for outlaws and others not wanting to be bothered with the trappings of "civilized" society. This area has been recently documented (LeJeune 2001) and is home to a diverse group, including colonial Spanish to the west of Natchitoches in Sabine Parish. The colonial town of Los Adaes near Robeline was once a capital of Texas. In Los Adaes, colonial Spanish influence is evident in the Catholicism and the food traditions of tamales and chilies. Elders speak a unique, archaic Spanish filled with Nahuatl Indian and French loanwords (Armistead and Gregory 1986). These Spanish and Indian groups work at cattle raising and lumbering. Further south around Beauregard Parish, a group emerged in the mid-19th century when a Native American community absorbed British-American settlers and other populations. These people became known as Redbones, from the West Indian term red ibo, which refers to any racial mixture (Kniffen, Gregory and Stokes 1987)."

http://www.louisianafolklife.org/LT/Maidas_Essay/main_introduction_onepage.html


"In July 1791, in Pointe Coupée, a fertile agricultural district 150 miles upriver from New Orleans, an Igbo slave, Latulipe, killed his master, Claude Trénonay. The assassination, occurring just six weeks before the slave revolt in Saint Domingue, led colonial officials to a plot masterminded by enslaved Africans of the Mina nation. The conspirators planned to kill their masters, seize arms, and free themselves. Though colonial authorities quickly crushed the plot, they could suppress neither black aspirations for freedom nor the entry of black émigrés from the French West Indies."

-"Haitian Immigration to Louisiana in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries"

Trans-Atlantic dimensions of ethnicity in the African diaspora (Page 82-93)
http://books.google.com/books?id=nSOyBs14tHEC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Trans-Atlantic+dimensions+of+ethnicity+in+the+African+diaspora&hl=en&ei=U0JeTJnjF4L-8AbW0Ym5DQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCcQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=igbo&f=false
 

Omowale Jabali

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Thanks! This is interesting:

"To the west along the Texas-Louisiana border, one finds the remains of "No-Man's Land," otherwise known as the Neutral Strip, which was formerly a refuge for outlaws and others not wanting to be bothered with the trappings of "civilized" society. This area has been recently documented (LeJeune 2001) and is home to a diverse group, including colonial Spanish to the west of Natchitoches in Sabine Parish. The colonial town of Los Adaes near Robeline was once a capital of Texas. In Los Adaes, colonial Spanish influence is evident in the Catholicism and the food traditions of tamales and chilies. Elders speak a unique, archaic Spanish filled with Nahuatl Indian and French loanwords (Armistead and Gregory 1986). These Spanish and Indian groups work at cattle raising and lumbering. Further south around Beauregard Parish, a group emerged in the mid-19th century when a Native American community absorbed British-American settlers and other populations. These people became known as Redbones, from the West Indian term red ibo, which refers to any racial mixture (Kniffen, Gregory and Stokes 1987)."

http://www.louisianafolklife.org/LT/Maidas_Essay/main_introduction_onepage.html


"In July 1791, in Pointe Coupée, a fertile agricultural district 150 miles upriver from New Orleans, an Igbo slave, Latulipe, killed his master, Claude Trénonay. The assassination, occurring just six weeks before the slave revolt in Saint Domingue, led colonial officials to a plot masterminded by enslaved Africans of the Mina nation. The conspirators planned to kill their masters, seize arms, and free themselves. Though colonial authorities quickly crushed the plot, they could suppress neither black aspirations for freedom nor the entry of black émigrés from the French West Indies."

-"Haitian Immigration to Louisiana in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries"

Trans-Atlantic dimensions of ethnicity in the African diaspora (Page 82-93)
http://books.google.com/books?id=nSOyBs14tHEC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Trans-Atlantic+dimensions+of+ethnicity+in+the+African+diaspora&hl=en&ei=U0JeTJnjF4L-8AbW0Ym5DQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCcQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=igbo&f=false
Thanks. My Grandpa (Demery) was born in the area near your first reference.

Interesting mix cuz my Mom's folks was "Creole" from NOLA and St. Martinsville, Baton Rouge, etc while my Dad's folks was countree...lol!

"To put it bluntly, blacks in Natchitoches were poor. They lived in dilapidated houses, had little money and lived under a racial caste system that subjugated them. This subjugation was inherent in the sharecrop system. The land has always been an integral part of the lives of African descendents since the transatlantic slave trade. First as slaves and later as farmers (sharecroppers, tenant farmers, and day laborers) blacks were tied to the land. Consequently, their everyday life revolved around farm life. This is shown by their remembrance of typical days and social life."

http://www.anthropology.uh.edu/Hutchinson/cane_river.htm

Both sides of my fam moved to Oklahoma and later to California, which is where my parents met...
 

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